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[personal profile] laughing_tree


Interviewer: In our initial interview you talked about Javier Pulido's sense of design and page layouts. How has that manifested in some of the pages you've seen so far? Are there some sequences from the first couple issues that you were especially impressed by?

Charles Soule: Literally every sequence, and that isn't puffery. Javier is brilliant -- he's a pure storyteller, and he takes every one of my ideas and makes them more interesting. He's told me repeatedly that all he needs is a good story. Give him that, and he can work miracles, and it's certainly been the case on "She-Hulk." Honestly, my scripts are pretty tight -- or at least I think so until Javier gets his hands on them. He tends to break them apart a little and reconfigure the paneling in large and small ways to make something new that's a killer synthesis of both of our takes. Just a true collaboration.

(http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=50811)

Read more... )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In 1972, Archie Comics made its first major venture, since the MLJ days, into horror, with the series Chilling Adventures in Sorcery as Told by Sabrina. (This is not to be confused with the Chilling Adventures of Sabrina title launched earlier this very month in the wake of Afterlife with Archie's success.) Loosely patterned after the EC and other horror comics of the fifties, it was an anthology title hosted--for its first two issues--by everyone's favourite Teenage Witch, written and drawn by regulars from Archie's creative team: writer Frank Doyle and, in the stories excerpted here, Dan DeCarlo and Rudy Lapick on art.

If nothing else, this horror host is easier on the eyes than EC's GhouLunatics )
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[personal profile] janegray
Previously on "Even genocidal psychopaths have feelings: the series", things were going pretty well for Starscream, until Megatron had the terrible idea to not be dead.

You see, Megatron's idea of "victory" and Starscream's idea of "victory" don't quite match...




Don't you just hate it when your crappy past catches up to you? )
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[personal profile] laughing_tree


"For some reason, I didn't think, 'Wouldn't it be cool to be Spider-Man?' I thought, 'What if you saw Spider-Man? What would it be like to be there?' "That 15-year-old self is still alive in me in doing stories in Astro City." -- Kurt Busiek

Read more... )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In my previous post, [personal profile] sindra pointed out that the victim's retribution on the protagonist was disproportionate, in that he claimed he merely wanted to teach him a lesson, via a "Hollywood Voodoo" (i.e., not real-life Voudon) spell, but in fact ended up killing him via reverse ageing. Instead, sindra argued, the protagonist should've been punished in a way that would spare his life and allow him to mend his ways.

My initial response was "Then it wouldn't be a horror story!" But then I remembered "A Spell of Misery!" from the obscure Charlton comic, Creepy Things (#2, Oct 1975), in which a villainous protagonist also finds himself on the receiving end of a "Hollywood Voodoo" spell, but gets a second chance to make amends. (Script: Joe Gill, art: Rich Larson.) The story even has a socially-relevant topic: the deplorable living conditions in inner-city slums. Unfortunately, like many a well-meaning "social relevance" story from the Bronze Age of comics, it contains flagrant racial stereotypes. Consider this a trigger warning.

Don't mess with Mama Carafino )
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[personal profile] shirubie
Hello everyone! This is my first post here I'm so happy to have found this place!

As a french-canadian living near Montreal, Quebec, I'm lucky to have access to a wide variety of comics from many sources: american comics from the US, franco-belgian comics from europe, manga translated in both english and french, and even some local talents (the "Paul" series by Michel Rabagliati for example). My local library has a large collection of comics of all kinds and I want to share with you all the most obscure and awesome stuff I can find.

For my first post, I'll start with one of my favorite franco-belgian comics, the goofy office gofer, Gaston Lagaffe.



This dude right here. But first, an introduction and some background information on this character. )

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Scans Daily
Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

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