thokstar: Spot (Default)
[personal profile] thokstar posting in [community profile] scans_daily
Photobucket

The comic is from Nukees, which is a long running webcomic about U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering grad students. (It also features a giant robot ant.)

Date: 2009-12-11 07:09 pm (UTC)
aaron_bourque: default (Default)
From: [personal profile] aaron_bourque
blah blah plastics are new blah blah was going to be called indian rubber man blah blah if you're gonna point out stupidity in comics please try something that wasn't pointed out 60 years ago.

Date: 2009-12-11 08:08 pm (UTC)
box_in_the_box: (Default)
From: [personal profile] box_in_the_box
It reminds me of Larry Niven's horribly overrated "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex" essay, in which Niven sought to "prove" that Superman could never lose his virginity - the first time I read it, all I could think was, "You're trying to use 'science' to justify COCK-BLOCKING this character, while at the same time accepting a premise for his super-powers that isn't possible under ANY definition of 'science.' TROLL HARDER, SILVER AGE FANBOY."

Date: 2009-12-11 08:25 pm (UTC)
icon_uk: (Default)
From: [personal profile] icon_uk
Larry Niven played as fair within the scenario as the comics presented it.

However, I think if you were looking for a serious real-world commentary about inter-species biology in "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex" you were kidding yourself to an extent way beyond what Mr Niven could achieve.

Date: 2009-12-11 08:31 pm (UTC)
box_in_the_box: (Default)
From: [personal profile] box_in_the_box
The problem being that countless other Silver Age traditionalists have taken Niven's essay as a gospel-truth explanation of why Superman can never have sex, in order to justify their beloved "love triangle" trope.

I guess what I hate about it is that I see it as part of a trend in superhero comics, in which fans and creators alike will condemn any semblance of mental, emotional, social or physical functionality or well-being within their superheroes as "unrealistic," given their powers, and then turn around and come up with the most outrageously impossible bullshit to keep them all miserable.

This is the sort of mentality that leads to fans referring to Civil War and Dark Reign as "realistic," when in point of fact, like 90 percent of all grim-and-gritty stories, they're just as unrealistic as bright-and-shiny stories, just in the opposite direction.

Date: 2009-12-11 08:51 pm (UTC)
icon_uk: (Default)
From: [personal profile] icon_uk
The problem being that countless other Silver Age traditionalists have taken Niven's essay as a gospel-truth explanation of why Superman can never have sex, in order to justify their beloved "love triangle" trope.

Like who? I've never once seen a writer acknowledge MoS/WoK as anything other than entertaining nonsense.

I guess what I hate about it is that I see it as part of a trend in superhero comics, in which fans and creators alike will condemn any semblance of mental, emotional, social or physical functionality or well-being within their superheroes as "unrealistic," given their powers, and then turn around and come up with the most outrageously impossible bullshit to keep them all miserable.

It was written in 1971 as a joke, I think it's a little late to suggest that it's a trend.

Date: 2009-12-11 09:59 pm (UTC)
autolychus2: (Default)
From: [personal profile] autolychus2
Hell, I love the MoS/WoK, for the simple fact that it annoys Super-fanboys/girls so much. But it should be taken in the context in which it was intended. It was and is a joke -- a well thought out and (to me) wonderful joke.

Date: 2009-12-11 10:15 pm (UTC)
icon_uk: (Default)
From: [personal profile] icon_uk
Heh, I loved it too! Had teenage me giggling rather a lot! :)

Date: 2009-12-12 12:50 am (UTC)
kamino_neko: Kamino Neko's default icon... (Default)
From: [personal profile] kamino_neko
I've never seen a writer do it, but I've seen a bunch of fans (and non-fans) cite it as gospel.

Date: 2009-12-12 07:11 am (UTC)
bariman: by perletwo (Default)
From: [personal profile] bariman
I've seen MoS/WoK used by writers a few times, but thankfully they were AUs and Elseworlds. One story I'm thinking of was in one of the Superman annuals, where Waverider was looking into people's possible futures to see who was Monarch. Lois and Clark used an experimental fertility drug to get pregnant, but close to term the baby super-kicked and gave Lois internal injuries, which she and the baby died from. Then Superman left Earth and shacked up with Maxima and had babies with her.

Date: 2009-12-12 10:05 am (UTC)
geoffsebesta: (Default)
From: [personal profile] geoffsebesta
Honestly, the only work I can think of that really uses it is Twilight: Breaking Dawn.

Which is pretty funny if you think about it.

Date: 2009-12-13 03:45 am (UTC)
pseudo_tsuga: ([Hellsing] Sir not Dame)
From: [personal profile] pseudo_tsuga
I thought of the same thing.

Date: 2009-12-11 11:43 pm (UTC)
auggie18: (Default)
From: [personal profile] auggie18
Ugh, same. I was never a fan of that essay.

Date: 2009-12-12 02:40 am (UTC)
aaron_bourque: default (Default)
From: [personal profile] aaron_bourque
MoSWoK was never meant to be taken seriously, in any case.

Date: 2009-12-12 06:33 am (UTC)
blakeyrat: (Default)
From: [personal profile] blakeyrat
Hm, do you think it might have been written as a *joke*? Maybe? A little?

Relax a bit, CAPS LOCK FANBOY

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