2017-09-10

[personal profile] history792017-09-10 01:14 am

Empress #1




"Since 1980 every director has tried to be Ridley Scott. Flash Gordon was the end of one thing and Alien the beginning of another. It’s very interesting because we always think Star Wars shifted cinema, but in reality it was Alien and maybe even moreso with Blade Runner. The latter wasn’t a financial hit like Star Wars, but it sparked something in directors and writers. As much as I love it, Empress is the antithesis of dystopian sci-fi."

- Mark Millar

"The bad guy in this, Morax, rules ancient Earth and he utterly adores his wife and children. He’s not abusive to them in any way and actually has this strong streak of morality when it comes to his family and doing the right thing. The idea is more than she’s now in her late thirties and realises that all the things he does which keeps them in their incredible lifestyle is just unforgivable and she realises that by carving out what she thinks was a nice future for her kids she’s actually doomed them to inherit this guy’s appalling mantle. Her son is a lovely, gentle kid and she’s especially worried about how he’d cope, but the big thing is that she just wants them to have a normal life. It’s a bit like Carmella Soprano in that when she was nineteen this all seemed very glamorous, but the reality of it all has been growing on her and as she hits her late thirties she comes up with a plan."

- Mark Millar


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Secret Warriors #5: To Begin the World Over Again, Part Five



'This book is a lot about how we come together in trying times. I was talking to a friend recently. He asked me why, in superhero books and movies, when something terrible happens, humanity panics but superheroes come together. I said, “Well, that’s sort of what superheroes are about.” Then, he said, “but that’s not realistic. When something terrible happens, humanity comes together. You can see in times of crisis that that always happens.” And it’s true.' - Matthew Rosenberg

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Batman #28 - "The War of Jokes and Riddles, Part 3"



The little part of him that broke when his parents died and he couldn’t put back together. That’s all the Joker is. It’s Batman without love. The Riddler is the opposite of that. It’s the detective in him. That utterly logical, has to get things done, has to solve this problem [guy]. It’s Batman without the humanity. -- Tom King

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cygnia: (Roleplaying)
[personal profile] cygnia2017-09-10 08:01 pm

[NS] RIP: Len Wein

Len Wein, Wolverine Co-Creator and ‘X-Men’ Reviver, Dies at 69


Len Wein, the influential comics writer who co-created Marvel’s Wolverine and DC’s Swamp Thing, and who helped revive the “X-Men” series in the 1970s, has died, his friends and industry colleagues said Sunday. He was 69.

The cause of death was not immediately known, but since March, his Twitter feed has detailed several health issues, including a spinal surgery and an abscess on his heel bone. His most recent surgery was Thursday, according to his feed, which included jokes wishing Wein had Wolverine’s quick-healing power.

 

Wein introduced Wolverine with artists John Romita Sr. and Herb Trimpe. The Canadian mutant debuted in “The Incredible Hulk” number 181.

Champions #11



"The Champions are about confronting the injustices of the world, particularly the ones younger people face. As a Marvel comic, though, we can’t be too on the nose. It’s sort of disrespectful to do a story about Ferguson, call the city Ferguson, and act like the superheroes can have anything to do there, because that belittles the efforts of the real heroes in that town. If we take situations like that, though, and sort of tweak and fictionalize them a bit, it’s clear what we’re doing." - Mark Waid

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