aeka: (Huntress [computer]:)
[personal profile] aeka posting in [community profile] scans_daily
Well peeps, as some of you may know, the second trailer along with the prologue will debut tonight at midnight with Sherlock Holmes and Mission Impossible. However, as usual, someone was kind enough to leak it online.

The sound and visual quality isn't great, but at least this gives us an idea of what we're in for. :}



Source link: http://www.movieweb.com/movie/the-dark-knight-rises/trailer-2

Description of the trailer in case video goes bye bye: http://batman-news.com/2011/12/15/the-dark-knight-rises-trailer-2-leaked-descriptions-are-online/

Hmmm...is it just me or has Bruce and Selina dancing at a masquerade ball become a cliche now in Bat cinema?

For legality:


Date: 2011-12-15 10:20 pm (UTC)
turtlefu: (Default)
From: [personal profile] turtlefu
Oh, do not even get me STARTED on Nolan and female characters.

The other one is D - A rather paint-by-numbers Femme Fatale.

Which is exactly what I expect both Catwoman and "Miranda" to be in this movie.

Date: 2011-12-15 10:22 pm (UTC)
mrstatham: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mrstatham
Has he ever employed one of them before in his stories? I suppose Cotillard in Inception could overlap into D as well as being C, really.

Date: 2011-12-15 10:27 pm (UTC)
turtlefu: (Default)
From: [personal profile] turtlefu
I remember reading an interview where somebody from Inception said that Marion's character was supposed to be a stereotypical Femme Fatale on purpose.

I would also argue Natalie from Memento is a femme fatale.

Date: 2011-12-15 10:31 pm (UTC)
mrstatham: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mrstatham
She does fit the bill of a femme fatale in Inception, but she seems... Much more deliberately antagonistic than the average definition of the idea, somehow. She's still a big, very attractive plot device, though.

Date: 2011-12-16 12:02 am (UTC)
espanolbot: (Default)
From: [personal profile] espanolbot
I suppose the idea is that by tipping the deck in the Joker's direction, by making him appear to be right over and over again, it makes the one time he's wrong (not expecting the boats to refuse to explode the other to save themselves) more impactive. Because through most of the rest of the movie he's dealing with people he's just flat out smarter than, so he's able to play off of them by appealing to greed (his henchmen and the Mob), fear (the police and Batman to an extent) or the rage of an already mentally unbalanced person (Dent). So when he decides to relying on people to use HIS logic, killing others to save yourself, the result is a lot more unpredicatable as there isn't really a set series of ways for people to react in that situation.

You can tempt a criminal with money. You can manipulate the police through fear. You can even go to a wronged and unstable man and point him in the direction he needs to go in to get revenge.

But you can't pick a guarranteed result out of trying to get one group of people to murder another group, particularly in a situation like that. Since the message in the movie seems to be that people are fundementally good and that the Joker is the freak for being as he is, the likelihood of people chosing to NOT kill to save themselves is skewed as being the more likely option.

This probably isn't always the case, as the variables can be skewed one way or the other to make murder the more likely option. For example, the "one man dies or I blow up a hospital" gambit is an example of how a similar idea worked, though as it was just a distraction rather than the Joker making a point like with the boats the result wasn't as important to the story. That put the life of one unpleasant and weaselly man that people didn't like even before the threat was announced on the line for hundreds of people (including, statistically, not only one or two of your relatives but also loads children and old people as well), and you suddenly get decent, random people trying to shoot dead an unarmed accountant in the street.

So that covers the Morality Test (the boat), the Emotional Test (Reese), which just leaves the Numbers one, I suppose, regarding the chase scene.

My guess is with that scene he already had a large amount of men in his employ (at least a dozen or so former Arkham inmates pretending to be cops in the memorial parade for example), so I don't think that it's that unlikely that he wouldn't either have them lining the more statistically likely routes, or equipt them with the means to quickly get into position if the convoy suddenly changed direction.

The basics of the cops plan were probably fairly easy to work out,
1. Transport Dent to GCPD HQ to the county jail.
2. Find the shortest route to take, as they knew that some kind of attack was going to happen (something that they were in fact relying on the Joker doing in person for his arrest to work out as Batman/Gordon planned).
3. Therefore, using the two points on the map, the possible routes that the convoy could take could be plotted out, and when it actually begins moving, you can redirect it into a more controllable environment (the tunnel got rid of the helicopter, which would go the quickest route to the tunnel exit, putting in the way of the cables).

Admittedly the cops could have planned to go a slightly different route, but considering they probably would have wanted to go from A to B as quickly as possible, that would have dramatically reduced the number of options they had in terms of directions to drive. Plus, with at least one person in Gordon's unit on the Mob's (and by extention the Joker's) payrole, the likelihood of a helicopter being involved and the convoy's route become a lot easier to plot.

The Joker's plans weren't impossible, as I said they involved either a lot of maths or knowing how to manipulate people's emotional triggers. It's only when he tries to make people fundementally do something against their nature does his plan not work right.

Date: 2011-12-16 07:29 pm (UTC)
valtyr: (americat)
From: [personal profile] valtyr
Scarlett Johansson in Batman vs Wolverine?

Date: 2011-12-16 07:41 pm (UTC)
mrstatham: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mrstatham
Possibly qualifies, but I always thought she was more integral to hinting at one of the big reveals than she was as a standalone character. There was also the wife/girlfriend/love of the character Jackman played, I believe, who falls straight into the same category as poor old Rachel.

Date: 2011-12-16 07:43 pm (UTC)
valtyr: (Jen she-hulk chinhand)
From: [personal profile] valtyr
She did fall fairly solidly into femme fatale territory, her value to the plot is separate from that. The issue is more than Nolan's female characters are very stock, rather than they're pasted on to the plot. (In my opinion, anyway.)

Date: 2011-12-16 07:50 pm (UTC)
mrstatham: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mrstatham
True. I think Rachel (in BB, at least) is the only one who felt like she was pretty necessary, somehow. TDK made her something of an unknown macguffin for Bruce and Harvey, and then turned her into a victim, but in BB, she was capable, tough, and pretty much steered Bruce onto the right track alongside Alfred, none of which I had any issues with, aside from Katie Holmes' occasionally terrible acting.

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