sherkahn: (Indiana Larfleeze)
sherkahn ([personal profile] sherkahn) wrote in [community profile] scans_daily2012-03-30 10:25

Amazing Spiderman #682 preview

ComicbookResources.com has the preview as Spidey takes his fight against the Sinister Six to new levels.




In the battle to save the planet, it's ...
... the Amazing Spider-man vs. Al Gore.


Wonder what Colbert will make of this?
drexer: (Default)

[personal profile] drexer 2012-03-30 19:29 (UTC)(link)
So...

Cliamte-change denialists have already infiltrated the ranks at Marvel? Because despite anything else that might come into the story, that's the message it seems to be trying to spread.

[personal profile] darkknightjrk 2012-03-30 20:06 (UTC)(link)
I don't think it's so much denial but rather not giving in to terrorist demands, no matter how tempting, and that politicians are overall major douches.
ian_karkull: (Default)

[personal profile] ian_karkull 2012-03-30 20:20 (UTC)(link)
But he's not demanding anything. He's offering to solve a huge problem. Spider-Man and the reader simply assume that he's up to no good because he's a super-villain and this is comics.
Regardless of how the story plays out, having the villain exploit international concern about a real world issue for his own gains and then having the hero publicly assault a figure considered to be synonymous with said issue simply looks bad, no matter how you slice it.
It reads like open disregard, if not outright contempt for the issue at hand, even if that isn't the intention.

[personal profile] darkknightjrk 2012-03-30 20:48 (UTC)(link)
Well, it isn't just Spider-Man and the readers--much like how the citizens of the Marvel Universe should have realized Norman Osborne wasn't going to protect the world like he promised because he's an insane sadist super-villain, they should feel the same way with Ock. In fact, this makes more sense, since it seems to me that the regular citizens are agreeing with Ock out of fear, and you could argue that political figures like "Gore" are exploiting the situation for their own gains just as much as Ock is.
ian_karkull: (Default)

[personal profile] ian_karkull 2012-03-30 21:10 (UTC)(link)
No, why would they? Doc Ock isn't the kind of villain that operates on a global scale or threatens the world -or anyone besides Pete, really- regularly and large-scale murder and destruction have never been his style. I doubt few people outside New York even really know who he is.
Besides, he's proven that his plan would work and he's a crippled man at death's door, there's absolutely no reason for everyone to go along with his plan out of fear.
And while I'm sure Al Gore enjoys the publicity as much as any public figure would, at least he's taking up a worthy cause hardly anyone in the United States seems all that comitted to, I'm sorry to say.
Stylizing anyone to be the posterboy/patron saint of an issue is ultimately the wrong way to go about it and slightly obnoxious, but it's hardly super-villain level explotation if it benefits everyone in the long term.

[personal profile] arilou_skiff 2012-03-31 02:18 (UTC)(link)
Actually, Ock has threatened mass-murder multiple times. (once he was going to nuke New York to prove that he could, at another point he was going to addict the entire world to cocaine, knowing that a good chunk would overdose from his delivery method)

lascoden: Anarky (Default)

[personal profile] lascoden 2012-04-01 22:05 (UTC)(link)
World wide cocaine addictions? When did that happen? How did I miss that?

[personal profile] arilou_skiff 2012-04-01 22:05 (UTC)(link)
It was the eighties/early 90's. White Suit Ock.
flint_marko: (Default)

[personal profile] flint_marko 2012-04-02 22:02 (UTC)(link)
That's not what happeend.

Instead of mixing poison into the Earth's atmosphere, Doc Ock is spreading a cure for cocaine addiction. Any person who has been subjected to the gas will violently convulse if they do cocaine, thus deterring them from doing the drug and possibly helping to break the habit. While this may sound like a good thing, the good doctor has ulterior motives. Doctor Octopus believes that with the large amount of wealthy individuals on the planet addicted to cocaine, he can sell the "antidote" for this "cure" for large sums of money so that the rich can still get high.