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[personal profile] icon_uk
For no reason other than I found this issue in a longbox not long ago, I bring you one of my favourite "bits" of Bat business from.... oh bloody hell... over 30 years ago Now I feel old....

Batman 370


LOVE that cover with layouts by the legendary (and underappreciated IMHO) Ed Hannigan who did a LOT of very clever and striking cover layouts. Look at the larger image in the link to see if you can spot where he appended the title to include the co-star! :)

Read more... )

zapbiffpow: (Default)
[personal profile] zapbiffpow
I wonder if Batman ever learned this little tidbit about Gordon during their field trip to the Gods Among Us universe.


Also, look who just made a cameo! Just slap the Gotham title and the FOX logo on that panel, and bam! Series.
Read more... )
Also, anybody see the Gods Among Us cutscenes? Someone put them together into a movie on YouTube, and it's as close to a Justice League movie as we're probably gonna get.
espanolbot: (Default)
[personal profile] espanolbot
The newest DC weekly has begun with a solid start as some old faces are reintroduced to the DCnU, and a Shocking Event that will have repercussions in the weeks to come...
Spoilers )
thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
This is a big one. Grab a snack.

I've been putting off reviewing Batman: Face the Face for five years now. Every time I started, my criticisms melted down into curses and incoherent ranting, until my computer screen became obscured by rabid spittle. Okay, it wasn't THAT bad, but still.

In some ways, it's actually an ideal introductory trade paperback to get into Batman. Like Hush, it's a murder mystery that also serves as a tour of Gotham's inhabitants, and it was immediately followed by Grant Morrison and Paul Dini's runs. Unfortunately, it's also deeply frustrating, especially if you're a fan of Harvey Dent.

This was the first story to use the character in the three years since Hush, since Loeb supposedly had plans for Harvey hich kept him in limbo until those plans would reach fruition. They never did, and I think folks at DC wanted their precious status quo back in place. I also understand that Two-Face is Dan DiDio's favorite villain, which may have been a factor. In any case, Face the Face is one of the most significant Two-Face stories in canon, and also one of the most painfully frustrating. After five years, I finally have the words to explain just why.





The lost year of Gotham's Unknown Protector, Harvey Dent )




Batman: Face the Face can be purchased here if you wish to read the story in full, including the Tim Drake subplot, several other Rogues doing their Rogue things, and the entire issue dedicated to Harvey and Two-Face's discussion. As mentioned above, it also serves as a gateway to the comics which are coming out today, leading directly to Dini's Detective Comics and Morrison's Batman.
thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
First off, my Henchgirl--being the learned and brilliant fangirl that she is--was sick and tired of all the misinformation about Catwoman's Post-Crisis history and origins, partially due to the fact that most of those stories are out of print. So she pulled together a ton of canon through scans and factoids and created the definitive, complete origin timeline of Catwoman.

She managed to incorporate and reconcile events in canon from several different sources, creating a single cohesive narrative that works beautifully and makes perfect sense. It's a thing of beauty, and biased though I may be, I'm honestly in awe. If only more actual comic writers gave the character as much thought and care as fans like Henchgirl does.

She put a ton of work into this project, and it shows. Check it out. Leave feedback/love/cookies.


Now, onto the Two-Face-Ness!


So I've been thinking a lot about Doug Moench lately. Not just his dubious Two-Face stories, but also Black Mask and Circe. And it's not just because I've been planning to post today's story, Moench's first Two-Face tale which also features the return of Circe (Black Mask's ex-girlfriend, whom he scarred and took on as his own henchgirl).

I've been putting off this issue for a long time, as I generally consider it one of the worst Two-Face stories of all time. For one thing, Moench is trying to juggle five or six plots at play over four issues, so the resulting story is a mess. At least I'll be simplifying things here by just focusing on Harvey and Circe, who actually meet here.





Be warned: this story takes a sharp left turn into Cracksville, by way of Ridiculous Lane.


Masks, makeup, flesh, and scars, all behind the cut! )

So what really happened to Circe? Anybody know? I'm thinking of making a whole profile page about her for ComicVine, because really, who the hell else will?

Moench would go on to write Harvey several more times, several of which are infamous (to those of us who care) as being among the very worst Two-Face stories. But perhaps memory is being too harsh. When I review them here and/or at my fanblog, I'll do my best to give them a fair shake. Yes, even with The Face Schism. *shudder*
pyrotwilight: (Default)
[personal profile] pyrotwilight
Hmm, I'll admit I wanted to kinda skip this New Blood. His power was amazingly stupid and very ill used even in this book. Though I guess at least one hero had to be gifted with powers that are...well...useless.

Meet Geist the Twilight Man. That's. Yeah.


The Invisible Man. But...Silly. )
pyrotwilight: (Default)
[personal profile] pyrotwilight
Some posts back we saw how Pagan, BatBruce and Joe Public reacted when a Bloodlines parasite struck Gotham. That was then....

Now Gotham has been taken over by Bane, the Batman was broken and a new Dark Knight patrols the city as their must always be a Batman.

It's time for the new Batman to meet New Blood.

18 pages from a 56 page story.


Gotham Goes Ballistic! )
thehefner: (Hugo Strange)
[personal profile] thehefner
If I said, "Name a comic released in 1986 where a superhero loses his job, reputation, home, friends, and family due to the machinations of his brilliant, scheming arch-enemy, who knows the hero's secret identity," you'd probably say Daredevil: Born Again.

But a mere one month before the first issue of DD:BA was released, DC published Batman Annual #10, featuring a story which completely matches the description above. Because they were published so close together, I can only assume this was a coincidence. Both stories reflect something dark in the mid-80's atmosphere that could cause Frank Miller and Doug Moench to write two different stories with very similar themes.

While DD:BA is one of my all-time favorite comics, Moench's is starting to work its way up my list of favorite Batman tales. There are a couple notable differences between the two. One is that Bruce doesn't get driven to a mental breakdown, although Hugo certainly got close in his previous attempt, published three years earlier.

In that respect, this also feels like a story that Grant Morrison had in mind when he created Dr. Hurt and wrote Batman: R.I.P., comparisons to which become even more explicit in the story itself...






This cut goes down to the bone )

Coming up next: Batman: Prey.
thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
Two-Face: Year One was a mess.

I don't know any other way to describe the most recent retelling of Harvey's origin, released to coincide with the release of The Dark Knight. The odds were against it from the start, as the main problem with retelling origins is that you've got to interest people in reading a story they already know, or at least think they know.

They may have read it multiple times in flashbacks and expositions, or maybe they just have one specific version they adhere to as the definitive version. For me, the definitive Harvey story is Eye of the Beholder, by Andrew Helfer and Chris Sprouce. For most others, it's The Long Halloween, by Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale. Either way, TF:YO was met with opposition and apathy before it was even released, and in the years since, it's shown no signs of being embraced by fans nor creators nor canon any more than Michael Green's recent Joker origin Lovers and Madmen (BUNNY!) managed to escape the shadow of Alan Moore's Killing Joke.

This isn't to say there shouldn't be new attempts at retelling origins. When it comes to Harvey, if they held steadfast to the classic Golden Age origin (or even the tweaked Bronze Age origin), we never would have gotten Eye of the Beholder in the first place. The question is always "What's this new take going to bring to the old story?"

To its credit, TF:YO had a couple novel and intriguing aspects to bring to the table. Unfortunately, for a slew of reasons, the final story was problematic to say the least. Maybe that's why it was seemingly ignored upon release, getting virtually no coverage from comic sites/blogs (I don't recall seeing a single review), or maybe the truth is more depressing than that: maybe people just didn't care.

But while I certainly cared, I also found myself alternately annoyed and bored, particularly by the poor pacing and awkward misuse of flashbacks. It read like a movie hacked apart and frankensteined together by a bad editor.

So in the interest of a cohesive story, I've decided to try something a bit different with this Two-Face Tuesday, and present the story edited into chronological order. Thus today, I offer you Two-Face, Year One: The Hefner's Cut!






A different look at a different look at Harvey Dent, behind the cut )
thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
So I've been rereading BATMAN: NO MAN'S LAND, both the original comics and the novelization by one of the comics' leading writers, Greg Rucka.

What really struck me is how, unlike the vast majority of multi-title crossovers (especially one that ran for an entire year!), it was far more based in character than action and events. The only part that really feels like an EVENT is the finale, which feels shoehorned-in compared to the rest, right up to the gratuitous use of the Joker and the gratuitous death of a relatively major supporting character.

But much like THE DARK KNIGHT--another story with a large cast of Gotham citizens--the human core of the story is Commissioner Jim Gordon. Really, in the real of all-time great DC comic characters, I think Jimbo has to be in the top ten. He's perhaps the only life-sized character in Gotham City, as heroic as he is human.

(Personally, I thought it was a huge mistake to lose Gordon as a cast member. OFFICER DOWN was a good story, but what was the point in having GOTHAM CENTRAL without Commissioner Gordon? Or Harvey Bullock, for that matter! Bullock, Gordon, and Renee Montoya are the holy trifecta of Gotham Police awesomeness, and to lose 2/3rds really robbed GC of what it could/should have been. But that's another rant.)

But a key component with being human is to be tested, and for one's flaws to show through. And as this is Jim Gordon post-BATMAN: YEAR ONE--where he cheated on his pregnant wife with Lieutenant Sarah Essen--it's a hell of a character to throw in the middle of NO MAN'S LAND.

And while this is Two-Face Tuesday and Harvey features very prominently, I think the best way to kick off his series is to look at where Jim Gordon is psychologically and emotionally as NML kicks off... and where he finds himself before too long.





We are two of a kind, Commissioner... )

Next week, Part 2: Gordon gives Renee Montoya a mission, Two-Face makes his move, and bonus extra scenes exclusive only to the NML novel where Harvey Dent and Renee are reunited. You do not know awkwardly cute until you have seen Two-Face with a crush.



Suggested tags: event: no man's land, char: jim gordon, char: two-face/harvey dent, char: question/renee montoya, char: harvey bullock, creator: bob gale, creator: ian edginton, creator: alex maleev, creator: d'israeli
kingrockwell: he's a sexy (Default)
[personal profile] kingrockwell
For those Babs fans among us who picked up Batman annual #27 and/or Detective Comics annual #11, we got a pleasant little surprise in this backup story by Amanda McMurray and Kelley Jones.

Kelley Jones is a name well-known to Bat-fans. Aside from his run with Doug Moench from '95 to '98 (which has had various revivals these days), I've always known him best for his covers during the Knightfall era. My older brother had a number of the issues, and I'd never read any of the interiors, but the covers alone were enough to impress on me as a kid. Jones' expressionistic and moody style did a lot to shape the way I looked at Gotham for a long time.

Amanda McMurray's a relative newcomer to the industry. I can only find a few stories here and there credited to her. Some of you may recall her Huntress story from last year's DCU Holiday Special with Rafael Albuquerque, and she apparently did the Superman/Doctor Light segment in the recent JLA 80-Page Giant (anything good in that bit?). Either way, though I certainly liked the Huntress story on the whole better than this one, there are part of this I like, and for that, I wish McMurray luck on whatever the future may hold.

kingrockwell: he's a sexy (Default)
[personal profile] kingrockwell
I'm not gonna try to showcase the story here since I want to do a post on Kelly Jones' Oracle story instead (prolly tomorrow!) and wouldn't have many pages to spare, but there were a couple interesting points I wanted to share.


(and i'm sure i'll do a full post on this story once INAtA gets that far, but that won't be any time soon. months, maybe years!)
[identity profile] parsimonia.insanejournal.com
This post is filling [insanejournal.com profile] kingrockwell's request for Jim Gordon interacting with people who aren't Batman and Robin, but I really love this book, so I might babble a little. Or, you know, a lot.

[identity profile] thehefner.insanejournal.com
Ed Brubaker's run on BATMAN was rarely brilliant, but it was by far one of the more solid and enjoyable Bat-runs in recent memory. I do wish more of it was collected in trade paperback, particularly BATMAN # 584, "The Dark Knight Project."

This is a solid little gem of an issue, the kind of great little one-shot that I could have seen making a fine episode of the animated series.

[identity profile] benicio127.insanejournal.com
So last post... last day... Joker/Harley week. Sniff, sniff.


Anyways this is my favourite scene from the novelization of No Man's Land by Greg Rucka. A lot of it a more detailed version of the comics, but he did add some great bits. I would highly, highly, highly, highly recommend this book to anyone. It's a great read and has some beautiful Cass/Babs scenes. His Babara Gordon is AMAZING. Seriously. Her anger over Huntress... gahhh... well I don't want to spoil it for you, but get it. GET IT!

And for legality, a scan from Mad Love.


This requires a bit of reading.... but it's only a couple of pages!

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