sigmund_droid: (Default)
[personal profile] sigmund_droid
Greetings again fellow Scan Dailiers.


If there's one thing you'll notice about my posts (other then I seem to mash the keyboard and I have an unhealthy obsession with Chuck Austen) is that I have a general interest in the origins of non-white superheroes and in particular black superheroes.

So without further adieu I bring you the origins of Wonder Woman's sister...Nubia!


Oh sorry her BLACK sister Nubia )
earthdefensehero: (Default)
[personal profile] earthdefensehero
Hey, long time listener, first time caller. So, what with DC's minorities talking a couple blows and whatnot with the whole Choi debacle and the white Firestorm coming back and taking over instead of having a black man with an Asian girl in his head and Asian Batgirl just giving up her title to the white girl for absolutely no reason, I got to thinking. DC has a ton of minority character, but a lot of them aren't used for anything and I swear, every young black hero that appears on the scene complains about a lack of black superhero role models out there when there are a ton of them which kinda irks me, being black and all. So bein' an artist of sorts I decided to help DC show that it's diverse.

Many Pages of Blackitude after the cut )
[identity profile] bluefall.insanejournal.com
The Wonder Woman mythos, plagued as it has been by "take over, change everything"-itis, has a fair number of supporting cast members who no one has ever heard of. These are the little guys who get a name and a relationship to Diana like they're supposed to be important, but have maybe five minutes of panel time in a run or, perhaps, if they're lucky, a whole storyarc, and then are never heard from again. Many of them, admittedly, were ignored by subsequent writers for a reason; the Sphinx and Quinn and Officer Modini and Bobby Trevor aren't exactly compelling pillars of characterization and interest, and don't have much to recommend themselves for further use.

Some of those lost characters are really damn cool, though, and deserve to be unearthed, brushed off and given a second look and another spin through the canon. One such buried gem is the amazon Nu'bia.





Scans are from Wonder Woman v1 #204-206, Supergirl v1 #9, and Super Friends #25. I cannot believe Super Friends ran longer than Supergirl. There is no justice in the world.
[identity profile] bluefall.insanejournal.com
Here we go with part two of my Nu'bia rundown, dealing with her infinitely superior post-Crisis incarnation. Free of tokenism, overt sexism, and laughably bad writing, and with an added apostrophe in her spelling to ever-so-slightly dissociate herself from being named for a piece of Egyptian geography (which seems odd to me, since Nubia is a reasonably common real-world name, but presumably Doselle Young knows what he's doing better than I), she was reinvented and reestablished as a character with an actual distinct hook and reason to exist, and a pretty cool one at that.



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