1963 #1

Dec. 10th, 2016 09:31 pm
[personal profile] history79



THE JACK KIRBY COLLECTOR: What exactly made those classic Marvel stories so revolutionary? Was it that the storytelling was more mature than DC?

ALAN MOORE: An extra dimension had been added to both the storytelling and the art. In a sense the DC characters at the time were archetypes to a certain degree. Archetype means they are one-dimensional. Stan Lee and his collaborators in terms of the story overlaid a second dimension of character. He gave them a few human problems. These weren't three-dimensional characters but they were of a dimension more than what we'd been used to, and something about the art kind of corresponded with that. With Kirby there was a level of attention to detail and texture and intensity about the art that seemed to give another dimension to the super-hero—to the comic book—than what was used at the time. It just seemed to be much more visceral, much more real. The Human Torch finding the Sub-Mariner in a bowery slum; that kind of had a visceral reality to it that was much more engaging.


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cyberghostface: (Doc Ock)
[personal profile] cyberghostface
I've always found this scene from Watchmen, particularly the closing speech from Dr. Manhattan, to be particularly touching as well as life-affirming.

Major spoilers if you haven't read it.

Scans under the cut... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


Comic stores can much more easily sell another Star Wars or Batman title. Why should they risk anything on Cinema Purgatorio? Hasn’t the war for “new” been lost?

Alan Moore: If the ‘war for the new’ has indeed been lost then there is now, officially, no point to the continued existence of our culture or, conceivably, of our species. If the massive asteroid were to hit us now, it wouldn’t be any great loss. Luckily, I don’t think that the situation is anywhere near as bad as that. I mean, what you’re describing wasn’t really a war, was it? It was more the mass capitulation of a generation or so of creators – or ‘content providers’, to use the current terminology – to the fact that, for the most part, they and their culture no longer possessed the capacity to generate new ideas or to bring those ideas to competent fruition. That’s not a war. Having been born in the aftermath of quite a serious war, I can assure you that there’d be a lot more bombsites, ration books and fondly mentioned relatives you never got to meet. No, a closer analogy to what’s happened to culture is more like if we neglected or worked everybody who actually understood, say, farming to death, replaced them with people who had enjoyed farm produce at one point in their lives and who had thought “Well, how hard could that be?”, and had subsequently seen our entire bio-diverse cultural landscape turn into a barren wilderness that yielded only one increasingly nourishment-free variety of potato. A lot of this might well be related to the ease of modern production methods engendering a certain laziness throughout culture, as mentioned above, but it still isn’t a war if we do not have an enemy except our own complacency and inertia.

And while comic book stores, in the short term, would be much wiser to invest in the latest movie-related spinoff, they might have cause to question how the long term effects of this policy have seen the greater part of the comic industry transformed from a genuine source of fresh ideas and energetic culture into a shrivelling appendage of Hollywood. They might also reflect on a lot of the out-of-nowhere successes of the last few decades, which would have all been occasions where the most sensible thing to do would have been to keep ordering the same steady-sellers and ignore the risks inherent in a new idea or title, even though today’s new ideas very frequently turn out to be tomorrow’s blindingly obvious classics. This was certainly record producer Joe Meek’s philosophy back in the early sixties: when he had a proven number-one hit on his hands with the Tornadoes, why should he risk anything by managing a bunch of unknowns like the Beatles?

Seriously, if the struggle for the new is over, then I wish someone would tell the forces of history, which seem to be propelling our world towards an anxious and uncertain future at an ever-accelerating pace. I’m sure that some of you might have noticed that this isn’t the same planet as it was last year, or even last week. The truth of our situation is that we are being washed away by a tsunami of the new, and by the very nature of its unprecedented novelty we don’t have a clue how to handle it. Thus we stand, gaping, pretending it isn’t happening, engrossed in the exploits of a character we remember from when we were twelve, humming a tune that was popular in the mid to late Seventies. Traditionally, this is what art and culture are meant to instruct us in, and if they have a purpose it is to help us assimilate and deal with our changing worlds, both external and internal. When we were going through the convulsions of the cataclysmic change from agriculture to industry back around the juncture of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Mary Shelley was able to articulate those new fears and aspirations by inventing the science fiction genre in her wildly avant-garde novel Frankenstein. It is the responsibility of genuine artists to create work which is sufficient to their turbulent times, and in my opinion you cannot accomplish this by continually rebooting and recycling the pop culture of the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties. How is any new culture – music, films, comics or literature – that is adequate to our modern situation going to emerge if there are all these shiny, re-imagined nostalgia-fetishist franchises standing in the way? Are we doomed to endlessly recycle the pre-digested waste products of the culture preceding ours, passing it on to the culture following us until the end of time? Has The Human Centipede taught us nothing?

The war for the new will never be over until one moment ceases to be followed by the next, and to declare that it is over simply because some creators on the front line have decided that they don’t have the stomach for it anymore, or because they can no longer remember how to load or use the weapons at their disposal, is to ensure that our culture is numbered amongst that war’s casualties, or perhaps fatalities. I have heard it said that there are those among the contemporary audience who feel it is their right to have the characters that they enjoyed as children grow up alongside them (which I think generally translates to “I am not yet ready to give up masturbating while thinking about Catwoman”), but I contend that this can only lead to a menopausal Strawberry Shortcake, Captain Marvel in incontinence pants, and Richie Rich in a nightmarish toupee declaring that Muslims, Mexicans and any other darkly-complexioned peoples beginning with ‘M’ should be prevented from entering America. I think we should ask ourselves if that’s the kind of world we actually want.


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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"It was Kevin [O'Neill], when we were two or three episodes into the project, who most perfectly encapsulated what we were struggling our way towards by saying that it wasn’t really horror movies we were concerned with so much as the horror of movies: our work in Cinema Purgatorio seems to be focussing in on the uneasy aspects of the way we watch films, with our simultaneous awareness of the lives of the actors and directors and production companies that are going on behind the painted flats, and our conditioned acceptance of cinematic conventions that are in as complete a contradiction of reality as anything that H.P. Lovecraft ever attempted, simply because we’ve grown used to them and barely notice them anymore." -- Alan Moore

One third of an eight-page story )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"We’re finding that horror has a lot of different flavours, and in Cinema Purgatorio we’re hoping to extend and educate both our own and the readers’ palates. And you never know, the reader might discover that they’re looking at forgettable old films completely differently and becoming aware of some of the uncomfortable shadows in the background. That has certainly been our own experience thus far, and there are an awful lot of movies or movie devices that I personally am never going to see in the same light again." -- Alan Moore

Read more... )
cyberghostface: (Batman & Robin)
[personal profile] cyberghostface
While it leaked online a few days ago the movie had a theatrical screening tonight and it becomes legally available for purchase tomorrow so I thought I'd make this thread.

Spoilers )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"Just making a small shift in the way that we were approaching the medium of film (via the medium of comics) seemed to open up an entirely new way of looking at things, with a resultant dazzling array of new narrative possibilities. By episodes three and four – “The Flame of Remorse Returns” and “A King at Twilight” if you’re interested, fear-fans – [Kevin O'Neill and I] were both becoming quietly convinced that these were about the best stand-alone pieces that we had ever done in our respective careers. Considering how fleeting and ephemeral some of our source material is, I think we’ve both been a bit startled by some of the profoundly human statements that have emerged, as if from nowhere." -- Alan Moore

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laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"I’m aware that a large majority of the current comic book audience are pathologically averse to anthologies, and you can certainly see their point. After all, when has anything memorable in the comic book medium ever emerged from an anthology? Except, obviously, Action Comics. Oh, and Detective Comics. And Sensation Comics and All Star and Adventure Comics. And Will Eisner’s work. And Jack Cole’s. And Mad and the entire E.C. line. And Amazing Adult Fantasy. And Tales of Suspense. And Strange Tales. And Journey into Mystery. And Creepy, and Eerie. And Zap. And the rest of the Undergrounds. And Comics Arcade. And 2000AD. And Warrior. And Viz. And almost all English and European comics. And almost all American comics, even single-character titles, until the 1960s. But other than that, what has the comic book anthology, or the Roman Empire for that matter, ever done for us?" -- Alan Moore

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'Considering how fleeting and ephemeral some of our source material is, I think we’ve both been a bit startled by some of the profoundly human statements that have emerged, as if from nowhere. Also, given that our brief and our intentions are to create horror stories, we’ve both been pleased to discover a new breadth in that remit. . . We’re finding that horror has a lot of different flavours, and in Cinema Purgatorio we’re hoping to extend and educate both our own and the readers’ palates. And you never know, the reader might discover that they’re looking at forgettable old films completely differently and becoming aware of some of the uncomfortable shadows in the background. That has certainly been our own experience thus far, and there are an awful lot of movies or movie devices that I personally am never going to see in the same light again.' -- Alan Moore

The first issue of Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's new anthology is out...

Read more... )
cyberghostface: (Batman & Robin)
[personal profile] cyberghostface


It's finally confirmed that Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill will both be doing their respective roles in 'The Killing Joke'. Tara Strong and Ray Wise will be playing Barbara and James Gordon respectively. Hamill posted the first image above.
There were these two guys in a lunatic asylum... )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



"The Courtyard was my attempt to write a story within the mythology of H.P. Lovecraft that did not try to regurgitate Lovecraft's style. It was an attempt to write a Lovecraftian story that was set in what was then the near future rather than in a Lovecraftian Era. As such, I thought it was a very successful story and it has always been a little favorite of mine in terms of my horror output."
--Alan Moore, AvatarPress.com

16 pages of 48 (Two issues; 8 each of 24). Trigger warning for gore.

'A mental floor gives way beneath me' )
superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime


"It’s a repurposing of the Lovecraft pastiche to make it a vehicle that tells us more about Lovecraft and his world rather than simply extending the roll call of unpronounceable gods. And rather than regurgitating tropes that were brand new and exciting back in the 1920’s, I wanted to create stories that were true to the essence of Lovecraft, but were as shocking and unprecedented as Lovecraft’s stories were when they first started to appear in small circulation fanzines and in the pages of Weird Tales." - Alan Moore

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