alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




For my final horror-themed post of the month, here's a Basil Wolverton creeper from Gillmor's Weird Mysteries #5 (June 1953). Public domain; thanks once again to ComicBookPlus.com for the scans.

I can do a much better job than a plastic surgeon! )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In the 1950s, when Basil Wolverton wasn't drawing exaggeratedly gonky people for Mad or horrifying apocalyptic scenarios for the Christian Plain Truth magazine, he wrote and drew a number of kooky and fun stories, full of his signature alliteration and rhyme, for younger readers. Among his recurring characters was the space hero Jumpin' Jupiter. Here's a representative story from Key Publications' Weird Tales of the Future (November 1952), which is in the public domain (scans courtesy of Comic Book Plus).

Well crack my crown and call me coo-coo! )
thebigapricot: (Default)
[personal profile] thebigapricot
I recently came across a delightful book edited by Art Spiegelman, "The Toon Treasury of Classic Childrens Comics". It includes a number of early comics including stories featuring Scrooge McDuck, Captain Marvel, Little Lulu and Sugar and Spike. Oh, and this
click )
[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com


*Ack!* Those things are just WRONG. This story appeared in MISTER MYSTERY# 7, September 1952. Basil Wolverton had a distinctive style like no other, it had texture and solidity that made it seem both unreal and convincing. He's mostly remembered for his twisted distorted portraits that appeared in MAD and DC's PLOP, as well as trading cards. Odd stuff. He also wrote and drew POWERHOUSE PEPPER, which used more alliteration per page than anything in history. Later in life, he did religious art that seems to concentrate on the coming apocalypse and it's as unsettling as you might expect.Earthmen Rod Crenshaw and Reese Bitner make a crashed landing on Venus, slamming down on the dense mysterious jungle. Not wearing any restraint belts (of course a 1950s comic), Bitner dies from a broken neck in the crash. Oh well, Crenshaw thinks and goes out to clear the encroaching fungus off the ship and make repairs. Then he notices some native life forms that are a bit unusual.

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