laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'Wanted to write this page since I was 9. Hope it inspires a picked-on kid, as the comics of my nerdy youth inspired me. "I'm still here."' -- Tom King

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"Mikel [Janin] drew him naked for the scene. I think it's a sort of inside joke with Grayson because he always drew Grayson with his shirt off. I looked at it and it came out of my mouth: 'Should we put clothes on him now?' There was something about it I like. He was so confident in his prison. He knew exactly who he was and he didn't give a f***.

"He had no care in the world. But it was just a sign of his power over all those people. Like, dude, I am the perfect god here and gods don't wear clothes. You know? To me, it was a symbol of that, a symbol of his willpower.

"I think what you're seeing in 'I Am Bane,' the arc that's coming up is he puts the clothes back on, he's got the Venom going back on, and those, to Bane, are signs of weakness, in that when he takes the Venom and leaves Santa Prisca, in my head that's a sort of sign he's giving into his worst impulses in a weak sort of way. His moment of strength was when he was comfortable with himself and not wearing any clothes."
-- Tom King

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'It was Andy Khouri, my editor on “Omega Men,” who asked if I knew his origin. I was like, “Yeah, he was raised in a prison.” And he was like, “No. Do you know his origin?” And I said, no, I guess I don’t remember. And he told me that not only was Bane raised in a prison, but he was stuck in a cell for 17 years that flooded every night. And he had to tread water while eating fish that were biting at him and leeches that were sucking off of him and then the water would go down. He’d almost die every night. It reminded me of Conan pushing the lever around. The will to have gone through something like that is the only thing that could challenge Batman. And then I became obsessed with him.' -- Tom King

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laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"1. Cassandra 2. Dick 3. Bruce 4. Damian 5. Kate 6. Helena 7. Jason 8. Duke 9. Stephanie 10. Tim" -- Tom King, ranking fighters

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thanekos: Yoshikage Kira as Kosaku Kawajiri, after the second arrow. (Default)
[personal profile] thanekos
They came with the same matter-of-fact effectiveness as the one he'd made at the end of #16.

They were well-aimed blows at Batman, struck with the precision befitting their striker.

They were elegant ones to see- the ease of their effect was the only thing a bit jarring about them.

One of them was a particularly neat illustration of that.

It happened amongst ruins. )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"The thing with Bane is that he can defeat Batman. Unlike the Joker, unlike the Riddler, unlike Mr. Freeze, the evidence is that Bane has defeated Batman. I remember as a kid reading Bane breaking Batman’s back and throwing him off the building. I remember how shocking that was, and how everyone in my school talked about it. That was the one thing that owned the comic book conversation that year." -- Tom King

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informationgeek: (Octavia)
[personal profile] informationgeek
avengersdisassembled04cover

"I also hope that when people read ‘Avengers Finale,’ they’ll see the love and care, which’ll help them appreciate the story and they’ll see it was done with the utmost love and respect." - Brian Michael Bendis

All the destruction in “Disassembled” was a product of the Scarlet Witch’s resentment over the fact that she had lost her children (who never actually, really existed in the first place), and she blames the Avengers for this tragedy. Why? We’re never clearly told, though it’s indicated that she resents the Avengers for keeping the tragedy secret from her. But why, exactly, she now deems all these heroes—who she’s previously saved the world with, lived with, laughed with—worthy of death is really still a mystery. What we can see is an antiquated stereotype that a woman’s logic will always be undermined by her child-bearing nature. Here is the Scarlet Witch, a weathered warrior, a proven hero, yet she spins out of control because her innate animal instincts as a mother smother all reason. She’d rather destroy long-time friends than ask that they explain themselves. Evidently, her maternal needs outweigh all to which her life has been previously devoted—goodness, friendship, redemption, love. How does this make sense? Well, we are told by Doctor Strange that the Scarlet Witch never really had proper control over her magic and, as a result, her sanity has been slowly compromised by her unruly power. And, here, again, is two tired, misogynistic messages: that a woman can’t control herself and that a woman in a position of power always leads to disaster. You can find these themes in many pre-feminist writings, yet it was commonly thought that perhaps we had put these themes to rest, now that women hold top corporate, political, and other such powerful positions across the world. Yet, Marvel must be a few decades behind in feminist theory. More embarrassing, Marvel must also be a few decades behind in their own continuity, seeing as the Scarlet Witch has been learning and mastering her powers over the past 40 years. After all, readers actually watched her training, something rarely seen with other heroes. Yet, this woman is still out of control? What’s worse—she now needs to be de-powered, forced into her rightful place by a man, a sorcerer supreme. - The Problem of the Scarlet Witch: When Bad Girls Go Good, but Not for Good

Story By: Brian Michael Bendis
Art By: David Finch


WARNING for sexism and aggressive exposition dumping.

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informationgeek: (RainbowDash)
[personal profile] informationgeek
avengersdisassembled03cover

The next issue of the series, issue #502 coming later this month, promises the death of one core Avenger- Scarlet Witch, Hawkeye, Yellowjacket or Wasp, a promise that has upset many fans. But is Bendis, with his new “language” for the Avengers, simply trying to redefine the core- and core members- of the Avengers? “No, they’re two different things,” he answers. “The story that’s being told now is about the Avengers as they exist now- the mistakes they’ve made and problems that they’ve had when they’re playing a game so dramatic, that’s so high stakes and those stakes will cost them everything. This is a very dangerous game, which is a given for all superhero comics, and we’re showing how that backfires. I think a lot of people realize that what’s happening is happening, no dream or fake out story, and it’s a little upsetting. This isn’t some hollow event. Things are happening. But we’re not doing it to shock, though there are certainly shocking parts to it. Something like this doesn’t often happen on this level.” - Article interview with Brian Michael Bendis

Story By: Brian Michael Bendis
Art By: David Finch

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informationgeek: (lyra)
[personal profile] informationgeek
avengersdisassembled02cover

Some are quick to decry this storyline as a soulless event or concoction of Marvel’s marketing department, but the “Disassembled” event has a very personal, very passionate origin. “It stems from a long standing nerdy idea, one of those ideas I’ve had since I was 8,” admits Bendis. “Anyone who reads comics had these ideas like ‘wouldn’t it be cool if this’ or ‘wouldn’t it be cool if that’ and we were in our big editorial meeting last year and we got to the Avengers. I started saying my nerdy idea out loud and forgetting that I’m in a situation where I could make it happen- I wasn’t pitching the story, just saying things that I thought would be cool and Mark Millar joined in with similar thoughts. Before the end of the day, after a lot of riffing between Mark and I, it became clear that one of us was writing the ‘Avengers’ with this idea locked in and I ended up the lucky one, because he’s already got his with ‘The Ultimates.’ Basically it’s all about the ‘Earth’s Mightiest Heroes’ tagline, what these characters can be and tapping into what the team has been about- change. Change in members, relationships- this isn’t too different from what Stan [Lee] did when he threw out all the popular characters and put in Hawkeye along with two members of the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants- there is a legacy of this kind of thing.”

....

“Another criticism is of the style of dialogue I’ve chosen for the book, a more natural, more conversational style that a book like this isn’t used to having, something I firmly believe can be accomplished in mainstream comics, even in a bigger team book where they can all talk like real characters and not plot devices. Yes, most mainstream books are written with a very similar language. Its one I study and enjoy. But it doesn’t have to only be that way, with that flavor. People who read ‘Ultimate Spider-Man’ or ‘Daredevil,’ they know this, but there are people reading ‘Avengers’ who are new to this kind of writing and think I don’t understand the characters or don’t have a grasp of them, or I somehow hate them.

“But all it is is a different interpretation of them. I fully understand what makes these characters tick, on levels that would embarrass any comic reader in the world.
- Article interview with Brian Michael Bendis

Story By: Brian Michael Bendis
Art By: David Finch

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informationgeek: (Octavia)
[personal profile] informationgeek
avengersdisassembled01cover

Avengers: Disassembled is controversial, even years after it was originally published. Truth be told, it probably will remain divisive for years to come. Still, I think it represents a turning point for the franchise, and it’s a bold ambitious and daring piece of work. Any comic that celebrates its five hundredth issue by mercilessly deconstructing its central team deserves a large amount of respect. Bendis’ work on Avengers might have its share of detractors, and I’m hard-pressed to argue it’s his best work, but I still think it’s a very challenging and breathtaking attempt to help rework a franchise that struggled to find its footing.” - Darren

Story By: Brian Michael Bendis
Art By: David Finch

Like with Civil War, we'll just be looking at random scenes from each issue.

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laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"You use that 75-year history to make it awesome. That’s not a weakness of this character, the fact that everything’s been done before. That’s a strength. You can build upon all of that. I can have a scene with Kite Man—a one-page scene in issue #6—and it’s so much fun and wonderful because Kite Man’s a character from thirty years ago that fans remember fondly. You take that history and you make it work for you." -- Tom King

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superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime


"I went back and did a lot of reading of first issues of Batman. It seemed like the general pattern was to introduce a villain as your huge contribution to the Bat universe. I didn't want to do that, so I went the opposite way and I introduced a hero." - Tom King

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superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime


"He's not a quipper. He doesn't make silly jokes. And if he does, it's because he wants to distract you. Every word and action Batman does have a goal to it. In that sense, Batman is an easy character to dialogue. But I think that can be a trap too. You can get it stuck too dark and dank. You have to be aware of your subject and be aware that Batman is smart enough to realize that although he is driven all of the time, being driven all of the time is not productive." - Tom King

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superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime


"I was a fat kid. I was a nerd. I read comics when comics were definitely not cool so I got bullied like nothing else. I remember when I was a kid in movies, bullies were the bad guys but at my school, the bullies were the cool kids and everybody was rooting for them. And they were rooting against me. And that's why I gravitated toward Batman. He was the guy that if the bullies hit you, he'd hit them back. He was the guy on the other side of that fist." - Tom King

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superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime


Scott Snyder: I’ve given [Tom King] a lot of advice – probably too much – but one thing I do remember saying early on is, remember that part of the fun of Batman is that he always wins.

Tom King: I think what he just said is the most important advice, cause I’m kind of a dirge-y writer. I write books like Vision and Omega Men and they’re definitely written in a minor key, of like, what a tragedy life is. So I have to remind myself that, when I was a kid, I read comics for the heroes. And I think the most noble thing comics do is, they give someone who’s had a tough day five minutes away from that tough day. And they give someone an adrenaline rush and show them that, in the end, the good guys win.


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Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

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