[personal profile] lego_joker
We've seen the end of the Silver Age Batman in a previous post. But as a wise man who may or may not be a figment of my imagination once said: for every end, there is a beginning. And as DC comics plunged headlong into the 1970s, the first shots of Bronze Age Batman were delivered, loud and clear, with the January 1970 issue of Detective Comics.

It would probably be fair to say that this story broke just as many traditions - if not more - than its predecessor. This, after all, was a Batman story with no Wayne Manor or Batcave, no Alfred or Gordon, no Robin, and no Gotham. It's a straightforward, pulpy little yarn with quite a lot in common with the first Golden Age Batman stories - the dark atmosphere (literally as well as figuratively - it takes place over a single night, after all), the high-stakes clashes, the overtones of mysticism and magic (Silver Age Bat-comics preferred to shy away from such things; even Bat-Mite was explained through sci-fi mumbo-jumbo), and more.

And men who brought this story to us? Oh, just three little nobodies by the names of Denny O'Neil, Neal Adams, and Dick Giordano.
Darkness, death, and Batman the (arguable) murderer, all behind the cut! )
mrosa: (Default)
[personal profile] mrosa
Jean Loring's insanity during Identity Crisis came as a surprise to many; some would even argue it was out of character. What many people don't know is that the seeds were planted all the way back in the Silver Age:

Read more... )
mrosa: (Default)
[personal profile] mrosa
After Frank Miller finished his first run on Daredevil, Denny O'Neill took over the title. I think it's an interesting and underrated run. Particularly I loved the Micah Synn storyline. It may not be great, but at least it respects the time-honoured tradition of showing another hellish Christmas for Matt.

Read more... )
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[personal profile] espanolbot
Ah, Arkham Asylum. Hospital for the mentally ill, prison for supervillains and the most mainstream HP Lovecraft reference in comicbooks! Now, when people talk about Arkham, it's normally connected in some manner with how Batman is "incompetant" in some way for not stopping the Joker, Killer Croc and company from routinely escaping from the alleged SuperMax facility whenever the mood strikes them.

Well today I've decided to have a look at the numerous ways that, really, it's really the Arkham members of staff who are at fault here, not just Batman not having the time to physically watch his rogues 24/7 to ensure they don't go walk about. Plus Halloween is coming up, and this is kind of good subject matter for the season.

Let's begin!
Read more )
riddler13: (question)
[personal profile] riddler13
Back at the golden old days of 2010, [personal profile] kingrockwell started a delicious series of posts about everyone's (?) favourite faceless vigilante. While reading those posts, I remembered how much I absolutely LOVED the O'Neil days back when I was a wee little lad. So I waited with eager anticipation for each and every post of that series, especially when he started to tackle the 80's incarnation of Vic Sage, a.k.a. The Question.

I don't really know what happened to our good poster, and I'm not sure if he chose to discontinue his series. However, I'll just assume they both took a temporary hiatus and, to keep the love for Vic Sage flowing (nothing personal, Renée!), I'm going to post two issues from the O'Neil run that can kind of stand-alone and will not, I hope, hamper [personal profile] kingrockwell's original idea of making longer posts with overarching themes.

Sorry about the images' layout. Still getting the hang of it )

That wraps up the first issue I wanted to post about O'Neil's The Question. Not one of the strongest, but nevertheless an interesting and intriguing story. That's more than I can say about the next one, in which O'Neil manages to combine my two favourite characters and come out with a disappointing result. I'll try to post it this week.

Meanwhile, give me your thoughts on this one, ok?
jkcarrier: me, at my old office (Default)
[personal profile] jkcarrier
A little late for Mardi Gras, but we were discussing death in comics over at the Noscans group, and it reminded me of the jazz funeral scene in this Batman story:



Batman #224, 1970: "Carnival of the Cursed!"
8 pages worth of panels from a 24-page story.
Warning: Villain uses some ableist slurs.
Read more... )
icon_uk: (Default)
[personal profile] icon_uk
From here;

Here are a few samples from a retailer who attended the DC Retail launch on Friday
Confirmation for what a number of us expected it would seem )

And for legality, a reason why working for Two-Face might have it's little perks when you've just rendered Gotham's finest unconscious...



To borrow one of my favourite Xander quotes from Buffy "Hands! Hands in NEW PLACES!"
althechi: (aparo bond)
[personal profile] althechi
All right, let's get straight to it! Vampire!Talia and aliens seemed to be the most popular, and I'm also including Zombie Nazis, because well, they're Zombie Nazis. Can't go too wrong with that.



Intro can be found here or four posts down.

There used to be a grey tower alone on the sea...  )

The Martians are coming! )

They're not just Zombie Nazis, they're Zombie *voodoo* Nazis! )

Epilogue )

And that's that for "DUEL". Thoughts? Comments?
althechi: (batman)
[personal profile] althechi
So I was digging around the comics collection in the house when I found this annual.



It's a collaboration between various groups of artists, showing Batman fighting various foes in different styles, bookended by Jim Aparo.

It begins with Batman trudging through the tundra, dragging a burden... )
With that, which segments would you lot want to see the most? They're as follows:

1. Batman fights demons in Hell (Keith Giffen/Malcolm Jones III)
2. Batman vs. vampire Talia and a dragon (Joe Quesada/Joe Rubinstein)
3. Batman against an alien insectoid invader (Tom Lyle/Ty Templeton)
4. Batman vs. Prohibition era goons (Dan Spiegle)
5. Batman fights zombie Nazis (and Hitler!) (James Blackburn/Micheal Golden)

I'll likely be posting no. 5 by default as it segues right into the ending.

thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
Harvey had a small supporting role in a two-part storyline where Jean-Paul Valley broke into Arkham Asylum looking for one of his old enemies. Unfortunately, he ran into a whole lotta released inmates, led by the Joker, who was using Harvey (and his coin) to judge where they should take their fun. The story itself is so unremarkable that I can't remember the plot details (it doesn't help that I don't own the preceding issues of Azrael), but it does feature a couple moments of Harvey crack, most notably these panels:





... ewwww. Welp, I don't think anyone's going to try taking his coin now.


Slightly extended context, plus one of the sadder times that Harvey's been punched in the face, behind the cut )
thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
This is a big one. Grab a snack.

I've been putting off reviewing Batman: Face the Face for five years now. Every time I started, my criticisms melted down into curses and incoherent ranting, until my computer screen became obscured by rabid spittle. Okay, it wasn't THAT bad, but still.

In some ways, it's actually an ideal introductory trade paperback to get into Batman. Like Hush, it's a murder mystery that also serves as a tour of Gotham's inhabitants, and it was immediately followed by Grant Morrison and Paul Dini's runs. Unfortunately, it's also deeply frustrating, especially if you're a fan of Harvey Dent.

This was the first story to use the character in the three years since Hush, since Loeb supposedly had plans for Harvey hich kept him in limbo until those plans would reach fruition. They never did, and I think folks at DC wanted their precious status quo back in place. I also understand that Two-Face is Dan DiDio's favorite villain, which may have been a factor. In any case, Face the Face is one of the most significant Two-Face stories in canon, and also one of the most painfully frustrating. After five years, I finally have the words to explain just why.





The lost year of Gotham's Unknown Protector, Harvey Dent )




Batman: Face the Face can be purchased here if you wish to read the story in full, including the Tim Drake subplot, several other Rogues doing their Rogue things, and the entire issue dedicated to Harvey and Two-Face's discussion. As mentioned above, it also serves as a gateway to the comics which are coming out today, leading directly to Dini's Detective Comics and Morrison's Batman.
pyrotwilight: (Default)
[personal profile] pyrotwilight
Another of my favorite issues from the Bloodlines event.

In a bit of a confusing event this issue was less about the heroes fighting off a Parasite (or really at all) and more about what happens when you make two New Bloods at the same time one good and one bad, but with another twist.

18 pages of a 56 page story.

Some odd art in the story and fairly uneven but I can't say I disliked it.



New Blood versus New Blood versus New Batman )
thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
Just under the wire!

I wasn't sure I'd ever own a copy of this issue. As it featured the first appearance of Arkham Asylum, copies were out of my price range (unless I'm buying rare back issues for my girlfriend--because I'm clearly the most awesome boyfriend ever, zomg--my limit is five bucks), but I managed to find a ratty-ass copy that was good enough to read and scan. Huzzah!

I'm glad I did, because while the story is dated and rough, it was surprisingly ahead of its time with how sympathetically it treated Two-Face. Sure, he was sympathetic in his original appearance, but that was only up to the point that he was redeemed and had his face fixed. After it got rescarred again, his very few appearances between 1954 and 1971 treated him more like a tragic character who's now just a villain to be stopped, and all sympathy for him died long ago. It's how many still write him.

It's also how Denny O'Neil himself treated the character in his first Two-Face story, Half a Life. I should post that here, both the original version and the recent recoloring, just to compare. But today's post is O'Neil's *second* Two-Face story: Threat of the Two-Headed Coin! from Batman #258 (1974). And this time, O'Neil takes a slightly different approach with the character, one which undoubtedly influenced the writers on Batman: The Animated Series in how they handled villains.

That said, it's still very early Bronze Age, right down to the cracky intro image, where Harvey resembles Wile E. Coyote to an oblivious Dynamic Duo:





Fun with atomic weapons behind the cut )

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