[personal profile] history792017-06-16 12:07 am

Jimmy's Bastards #1




"Running through the story is a lighthearted (ish) critique of current social and political commentary, wherein some of the ways in which the political left expresses itself comes in for a bit of a bashing. These are people I want to see succeed, but I worry they undermine themselves with the sometimes extremely pompous manner in which they respond to the world.

An obvious example would be the appalling phrase “politically correct”, which was horribly self-righteous to begin with but has now rebounded on its original exponents, who’ve ended up simply handing the bad guys a stick with which to beat them. Its modern equivalent seems to be the even more dreadful “problematic”. If you’re going to express disgust, don’t be polite about it."

- Garth Ennis


Read more... )
[personal profile] history792017-06-13 11:14 pm

Preacher #1




CBS NEWS: This comic's publication in 1994 seems like a turning point in the industry. Do you sense how it influenced the comics world since?

GARTH ENNIS: At the time, there was a real sense of treading on uncharted ground. Certainly no one else was doing anything like it in comics, so there was a good deal of groping in the dark. Comics up to that point, until the mid-80s, had effectively been juvenalia, so that was the point of Vertigo, to be able to do material like that in mainstream comics. As the influence it's had since, that's harder for me to say. I feel that the material that inspired Vertigo back then has been to an extent cordoned off and forgotten -- perhaps not forgotten, but it's been put on its reservation.

Alan Moore's work on "Watchmen" and "Miracleman" -- that should have written the end of the superhero. But they've essentially been shoved off to the side and superheroes have continued like a juggernaut. I don't really read a lot of comic books and it's because of that domination of the superhero. If I was to talk about "Preacher"'s influence, I can kind of see that in "Y: The Last Man" by Brian Vaughn. Beyond that, I would find it hard to trace "Preacher"'s exact influence.


Read more... )