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[personal profile] cyberghostface


"I'd also like to stress that the portrayal of Batman presented here is not definitive and is not necessarily how I would write the character otherwise. The repressed, armoured, uncertain and sexually frozen man in Arkham Asylum was intended as a critique of the '80s interpretation of Batman as violent, driven and borderline psychopathic. My own later portrayal of Batman in the JLA comic was one which emphasized the character's sanity and dignity; in the end, I figured that anyone who had gone so far and been so successful in his quest to avenge his parents' death and to help other people would have ended up pretty much straightened out. Bruce Wayne would only have become conflicted and mentally unstable if he had NOT put on his scary bat-suit and found the perfect outlet for his feelings of rage, guilt and revenge." - Grant Morrison

Scans under the cut... )
[personal profile] history79



"The 'Planet X' story was partially intended as a comment on the exhausted, circular nature of the X-Men's ever-popular battle with Magneto and by extension, the equally cyclical nature of superhero franchise re-inventions. I ended the book exactly where I came on board, with Logan killing Magneto AGAIN, as he had done at the end of Scott Lobdell's run. Evil never dies in comic book universes. It just keeps coming back. Imagine Hitler back for the hundredth time to menace mankind. So, in the way that something like 'Marvel Boy' had that insistent 'teenage hard on' engine driving its rhythms, 'Planet X' is steeped in an exhausted, world-weary, 'middle-aged' ennui that spoke directly of both my own and Magneto's frustrations, disillusionment and disconnection, as well as the endless everything-is-not-enough frustrations of a certain segment of comics aging readership. In hindsight, I think I overdid the world weary a little but, you know, my loved ones were dying all around me while I was working on those issues, so I'm entitled to a little stumble into miseryland. Fantomex's line [he accused Magneto of speaking in cliches] summed up my own cynicism at that moment, definitely and seems justified by subsequent plot developments. In my opinion, there really shouldn't have been an actual Xorn - he had to be fake, that was the cruel point of him - and it should have been the genuine Magneto, frayed to the bare, stupid nerve and schizoid-conflicted as he was in Planet X, not just some impostor. There's loads of good stuff in Planet X - it's just that miasma of bleakness and futility which hovers over the whole thing.

What people often forget, of course, is that Magneto, unlike the lovely Sir Ian McKellen, is a mad old terrorist twat. No matter how he justifies his stupid, brutal behaviour, or how anyone else tries to justify it, in the end he's just an old bastard with daft, old ideas based on violence and coercion. I really wanted to make that clear at this time."

- Grant Morrison

Source: http://geoffklock.blogspot.de/2006/07/why-grant-morrisons-magneto-sucks.html


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[personal profile] history79



"Magneto’s an old terrorist bastard. I got into trouble—the X-Men fans hated me because I made him into a stupid old drug-addicted idiot. He had started out as this sneering, grim terrorist character, so I thought, Well, that’s who he really is. [Writer] Chris Claremont had done a lot of good work over the years to redeem the character: He made him a survivor of the death camps and this noble antihero. And I went in and shat on all of it. It was right after 9/11, and I said there’s nothing f*****g noble about this at all."

- Grant Morrison

Source: http://www.mtv.com/news/2624941/grant-morrisons-playboy-interview/


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[personal profile] laughing_tree


"The thing we've always for the last fifteen years at least -- certainly since 9/11 -- I think America's been processing the horror of those images through their art, through their popular art in particular.

"That's why I think superheroes became from ordinary people who went out at night to make the world a better place, they've become I think agents of the military-entertainment complex. The Avengers work for the government, and it's been like that since Mark [Millar] did The Ultimates. Batman as seen by Christopher Nolan and subsequently is a soldier. He wears military gear with his ordinance and his machines. For me, it became quite reductive. It was an interesting way to look at it for a while, but it's persisted for so long that I'm quite bored with the idea that the best superheroes can represent is some aggressive version of the military.

"So it seemed like it was very worthwhile to go to cultures that weren't dealing with that, and go back to things that superheroes are supposed to be. They're supposed to be champions of the oppressed, they help ordinary people, they make things better for people. They don't prop up our grotesque, doddering culture of war and aggression."
-- Grant Morrison

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Klaus #7

Sep. 2nd, 2016 07:04 pm
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"I was drawn to the idea of framing Santa Claus as the world’s most famous superhero; the one most kids would already have a powerful identification with —and the one owned by no corporation." -- Grant Morrison

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


"Once we could talk about a much wider array of subjects before the superheroes were tied to a very specific mindset. And as I say, in other cultures and in India specifically, we're getting to use superheroes in a culture that's quite forward-looking. If you see the video that Sharad [showed at Comic-Con], it's talking to all the young girls, saying "what super power would you like?" And all the powers are these really benign, helping-people powers. "I want to touch trees and it comes back to life, I want to touch a mud hut and it turns into a house, I want to take away people's sickness." And you contrast that with our image of a female superhero who's Wonder Woman with a sword and a shield and a grunting grimace on her face, she's a warrior from some ridiculous mythological past.

"So I liked the idea as well of turning people this slightly more feminine approach and trying to get superheroes back to what they do best, which is helping people, and not just protecting their own asses from the latest monstrous villain."
-- Grant Morrison

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