[personal profile] history792017-01-16 10:05 pm

Marvel 1985 #2




"I’ve always had this idea of a super-hero comic with characters that we know and grew up with coming to our world. I’ve had that idea since I was a kid. I love the idea of that. The villains of the Marvel Universe like Dr. Doom and the Red Skull and Magneto and these guys all finding a way here. We have New York, we’ve got London, we’ve got Tokyo and all these cities they know, but we don’t have Captain America, Reed Richards or the X-Men to protect us. I always felt there was a story there. That’s really the genesis of the whole thing."

- Mark Millar


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[personal profile] history792017-01-15 08:15 pm

Marvel 1985 #1




NEWSARAMA: At the initial wave of promotion for this, you referred to it as a "Narnia" for Marvel…

MARK MILLAR: Yeah, totally. And it was funny because a lot of people were bent because they were thinking it was going to be elves and goblins and all that kind of stuff, but really what I meant was that it was about someone in the real world meeting an imaginary universe. It’s a Marvel fairy tale - and not in some lame way with goblins and pointed ears, but in a way that my daughter, who’s 10, could read and understand. It’s very dark in places, and very real, and probably the safest thing I’ve written in that you could show it to children without social services coming to ask you some questions.


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Civil War #6-7

civilwar7cover

When it comes to the actual battles that the characters in “Civil War” will be fighting, readers shouldn’t expect the anti-registration side to just be reactive in fighting for their cause. “They will be a combination of both reactive and proactive,” Millar explained. “I didn’t want to just have these guys in, say, like a terrorist cell or anything because fundamentally Cap’s guys are superheroes. So, the rationale for the Marvel Universe shouldn’t be that they’re just underground guys who are constantly fighting the forces of the status quo. They’ve got to be superheroes. They’ve got to go out and actually fight super villains and, unfortunately, SHIELD and the other superheroes are after them when they’re doing so. It’s an added tension to the whole thing.”

“Civil War” is a conflict between the heroes of the Marvel Universe, but the villains do a play a role in the series. Millar is keeping their part in the story a secret, but he did reveal that he would be touching on an idea from his “Marvel Knights Spider-Man” run in which a secret cabal of industrialists conspired to create many of the costumed villains in the Marvel Universe. “There’s some stuff going on with the villains about half way through the book, but really the main focus of the series is the split between the heroes and the other stuff is just really seasoning.”

The split between the heroes is over the superhuman registration act, which mandates that anyone who puts on a costume and goes out to try and enforce the law must register with and become an agent of the federal government. Heroes who violate the law will find themselves imprisoned in newly redesigned secretive superhuman penitentiaries. “That’s actually quite a big plot point,” Millar stated. “There’s a whole new way of storing super villains and heroes who refuse to sign. It’s quite a big deal. We’re really updating the Marvel Universe in a lot of ways.”

“Civil War” will also address how countries around the world view the US government’s new policy on super humans. Some of the fictional Marvel countries that don’t exactly see eye to eye with the US, like Wakanda, Latveria, Atlantis, and Providence, might even become embroiled in the events of the story. “Some will be involved quite a bit and others will remain neutral and others might come in at a later stage,” Millar explained. “That’s part of the meat of the story really.”

The various countries of the Marvel Universe will have different degrees of participation in “Civil War,” but the globe spanning organization SHIELD will play a definite part in the mega-story. “SHIELD’s new boss Maria Hill isn’t quite as cozy with the superheroes as Nick Fury was,” Millar stated. “So, that works very well within the scenario. It would have been a lot harder to do this if Nick, who is very pro-superhero, was in charge because he would have been probably against the registration act, whereas, Maria Hill made the story a whole lot easier for that.”
- from a Comic Book Resources Article

Story By: Mark Millar
Art By: Steve McNiven

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Civil War #1

civilwar1cover

"I want them to get the same kind of fun out of it as I got out of ‘Crisis on Infinite Earths’ or one of the big crossovers like ‘Secret Wars'." - Mark Millar

Story By: Mark Millar
Art By: Steve McNiven

What a better way to ring in the New Year by saying good bye to Civil War II: Battle Tendency, by looking back at the original event... Mark Millar's Civil War...

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[personal profile] history792016-11-13 09:06 pm

Reborn #1




"It’s one of those universal things that regardless of what faith you have, or if you have no faith at all, or whatever country you live in, at some point, kind of in the back of your mind you’re like, where do we go? It just seemed kind of fun to come up with the answer."

- Mark Millar


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[personal profile] history792016-09-05 05:30 pm

Supercrooks #2




"I think gay characters in particular can be quite stereotypical in comic books, they can be quite set. I remember the first gay character I saw was in a book called Global Champions, and he had giant hoop earrings , I remember thinking, even as a kid, this is outrageous. I just thought 'why not have a gay character who's the ultimate bad-ass.' I wanted somebody who was just cool and I liked the idea of a superhero who was being blackmailed, I thought it was quite cool to have a good guy who was being forced by the bad guys into helping them because he had a secret, but it had to pay off at the end, I didn't want him to be this negative character, I wanted him to be quite positive."

- Mark Millar


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