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[personal profile] laughing_tree


"We all know someone like Lou: the one who strives so hard to be organized, to be ambitious, to participate in the anodyne rat race around her like a good little consumer ... but just can't do it. She's got too much chaos in her. The tragedy of Lou, and a billion people like her, is that nobody's ever told her it's okay to be chaotic." -- Si Spurrier

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"The werewolves of London are chihuahuas compared with the hardier breeds we have out here in the regions. With Cry Havoc Si Spurrier, Ryan Kelly and their ingenious colour and design cohorts unveil an electrifying account of black ops, black dogs and weaponised folklore that is unlike anything you've ever seen. Best in show." -- Alan Moore

"The supernatural spec-ops comic for grown-ups. Literary, human, complicated, bloody, horrible, compulsive." -- Kieron Gillen

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[personal profile] history79



"I think The Howling is great, I really respond to the notion of something secret crawling out into the open. The stuff at the end in particular is quite cogent to what goes on Cry Havoc, but for me it has got to be An American Werewolf in London. Its use of werewolves as a lens through which to see a new take on the characters and to the way it introduces comedy to the story – I’m thinking specifically of that amazing scene in the cinema with all the rotting corpses. I like the idea that you can use these supposedly quite conventional, supposedly ‘rule-abiding’ monsters, in a way that isn’t really about the monsters at all. It’s about the character, the culture, or whatever it may be. Also, Jenny Agutter, which is all I really need to say about that, so all other arguments are invalid."

- Simon Spurrier


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[personal profile] superboyprime


"In the 1960s, it was the Cold War and the space race. What could take us up there? The idea of aliens being up there, and then it all fell into place." - Charles Soule

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[personal profile] informationgeek
survivors'club01cover

"For many, the ‘80s along with the ‘70s was a golden era for horror films. A lot of those films from then are deeply ingrained in pop culture. We all know the story of The Exorcist, A Nightmare On Elm Street and Friday The 13th and so on. They have almost become our generation’s fairytales. We draw a lot on that mythology in Survivors’ Club, but we take it in unexpected directions." - Dale Halvorsen

"Brainy, ambitious and delightfully scary, Survivors' Club is a throwback to books like The Sandman and Hellblazer that made Vertigo a legend" - Joe Kelly, Locke & Key (quote on the front cover of the issue)

Writers: Lauren Beukes and Dale Halvorsen
Artist: Ryan Kelly
Colorist: Eva De Cruz

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[personal profile] informationgeek
Vertigo is to me what Image Comic seems to be others. While everyone gets excited over whatever Image puts out, Vertigo does that for me. It's produced some my favorite comics of all time (Fables, iZombie, Scalped, Saucer Country, and The Unwritten), but it has been falling on hard times recently. This imprint barely had any new titles at all!

...that is, until just recently...

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Three #5

Apr. 16th, 2014 09:11 am
arbre_rieur: (Default)
[personal profile] arbre_rieur


"Strictly speaking, I suspect there’s an analysis of THREE that would argue I fridged Tyrtaois. Depends how you’d define fridging, really. If it’s any character’s death being used to forward another character’s emotional arc, then sure.

"To be honest, I’m ambivalent to a definition that strong. Gratuitous death of a prop character with no life outside of their relationship with the lead to give cheap and nasty motivation for that lead would be my preferred one. The problem with a definition as strong as the first one is that it’s basically in denial of the fact people care about other people."
-- Kieron Gillen

Continuing from the previous issue...

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Three #4

Mar. 18th, 2014 08:51 pm
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[personal profile] arbre_rieur


"It's a purer story [than a superhero comic]. There's less need for deconstruction or playing with genre conception. There have been so many superhero stories, you have to move away from the pure archplot to make it work. Hell, in a shared universe, that also changes everything. There's a lot of other pressures, in terms of what's been done before and everything else, and what feels fresh.

"There's been very few stories about Helot slaves on the run. I can move closer to the rhythms of legend, myth and historical fiction."
-- Kieron Gillen

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Three #3

Mar. 9th, 2014 04:49 pm
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[personal profile] arbre_rieur


"I was going to demonize [the Spartans] as much as the Xerxes troops were demonized in 300, and in the end I wound up much more interested in trying to present an image of how Sparta operated. -- Kieron Gillen

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Three #2

Dec. 16th, 2013 05:40 pm
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[personal profile] arbre_rieur


'Basically, a story about everything relating to Sparta which is left out of pro-Spartan descriptions. You know, all the things which made Hitler think of Sparta as his model of a racialist state.

'It's an equal and opposite response to the view of Sparta presented by "300."'
-- Kieron Gillen

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Three #1

Nov. 8th, 2013 10:43 pm
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[personal profile] arbre_rieur


“I came home from these regular monthly drinks that we have in London and grabbed one of the nice hardback comics next to the bed–and in this case it was [Frank Miller's] 300. I picked it up, flipped through it, really not very much paying any attention to it. And one of the speeches about ‘The only free men the world has ever known,’ and literally had a moment of incandescent rage and shouted at the book, ‘You hunted slaves!’ And at that second the entire plot of Three downloaded, including the twist, the structure, everything.” -- Kieron Gillen

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BUNNIES

May. 19th, 2012 12:21 am
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[personal profile] arbre_rieur


Here are four pages from issue 3 (plus two from issue 2) of SAUCER COUNTRY, Paul Cornell and Ryan Kelly's new series about politics and the paranormal.

Last issue, we saw Governor Alvarado hire Joshua Kidd, a professor of mythology, to help make sense of her recent abduction experience...

The Silver Woman in the Waiting Room, and other oddities... )
arbre_rieur: (Default)
[personal profile] arbre_rieur


Here's a third of issue 1 and four pages from issue 2 of SAUCER COUNTRY, Paul Cornell's new Vertigo ongoing series about UFO culture, politics, and what happens when they intersect.

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[personal profile] stubbleupdate
As was discussed in the most recent edition of House to Astonish, Vertigo had their lowest sales month on record in January 2012. Happily though, they're launching 4 new series soon, including a Fables spin-off with art by Adam Hughes ).

The one that caught my eye, out of the series released in the digital preview, was Saucer Country, by Ryan Kelly (artist of Local, which really is a fantastic book, and of New York 4 and 5), and written by Paul Cornell, of Action Comics, Demon Knights, Captain Britain and MI:13 et al.

Nicking the solicit text from Espanolbot's post you get

Arcadia Alvarado, the leading Democratic candidate for President of the United States, says she was "abducted by aliens."
As the Mexican-American Governor of New Mexico, she's dealing with immigration, budget cuts and an alcoholic ex. She's about to toss her hat into the ring as a candidate for President in the most volatile political climate ever.
But then...a lonely road and a nightmarish encounter have left her with terrible, half-glimpsed memories. And now she has to become President. To expose the truth – and maybe, to save the world.
Arcadia's quest is at the heart of this new monthly series from writer Paul Cornell (DEMON KNIGHTS, ACTION COMICS, Doctor Who) and artist Ryan Kelly (NEW YORK FIVE, NORTHLANDERS). With the help of her quirky staff, Arcadia will pursue the truth of her abduction into danger, mystery and awe. SAUCER COUNTRY is a dark thriller that blends UFO lore and alien abduction with political intrigue, all set in the hauntingly beautiful Southwest.

There's a small house ad and two pages from the preview underneath. It comes with a warning for discussion on domestic abuse
Saucer Country )

Got wood?

Jun. 24th, 2011 08:40 pm
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[personal profile] stubbleupdate
It's been a light week for comics for me and the postie hasn't delivered my Casanova or DMZ yet. Boo to that.

So, here's some clippings from Brian Wood's Public Domain sketchbook )

And from Local #5. You should buy the hardback edition because a) it's totally value for money, b) it's a very good, rich story, c) the art is lovely and d) I'm not sure that I own a book that looks better on my shelf.

Local follows a young woman, Megan, around America and a bit of Canada as she finds herself. Each issue is a different location and a different done in one story, all feeding into the larger arc. Today, we're in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where Megan works at a cinema. )

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