laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'Fans sometimes hold a very clearly defined view of what their favourite character should be like, or (more commonly) a fixed impression of when that character was exactly “right”. Anything which came before that point, and anything which has come after, very quickly takes on the aspect of deviation or waywardness. You’ll hence find that some people don’t talk about their favourite characters “changing” or “evolving” or “developing”, or any of the slow states of modification which are the bread-and-butter of longform comics, but in terms of “being ruined” or “being fixed”, which is a quite sad way of rendering an interesting fictional personality utterly passive and non-plastic. It’s a phenomenon which is sadly fed by the cyclical nature of some comics.' -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"Counter-intuitively I'd tend to argue there's actually a very sophisticated mental technology at work there, which allows us to be moved and shocked by character deaths even though we secretly know it probably won't stick. It's the Big Lie which we're clever enough to Knowingly Fall For when it comes to emotionally responding to the material. In those cases we readers are essentially endowing a story with the verisimilitude it arguably doesn't deserve, and if you've seen me ranting before about how your brain rewards subconscious investment in a fiction with far greater emotional payoffs, then you'll see why that's actually a very powerful and positive thing." -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )

X-Force #9

Nov. 18th, 2014 05:18 pm
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"99% of the time it's perfectly reasonable that we craft our stories around conflict and duality without painfully laboring a point about how wretched violence truly is. In most superhero comics we're dealing with modern mythologies, after all: the complex interactions of today's cultural pantheon waging their wars in heaven. There's no need, therefore, for brutal reminders about the fibrousness of human flesh or an accurate depiction of a torn body. The Marvel Universe, seen in one light, is simply a contemporary analogue for Ragnarok, or the Kali Yuga, or the book of Revelation: a shimmering dreamspace from some uncertain future or hazy parallel, echoing and exaggerating our own world, wherein the fundamental contests of divine morality can be settled in dramatic form. In most cases the point of superhero battles is to delineate moral roles and glorify physical or mental prowess, not to underline the ickiness and self-fulfilling corruption that goes hand-in-hand with a truly violent lifestyle." -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'My true, secret goal -- when I first took the "X-Force" gig -- was to establish a million continuity errors and moments of bare-faced wrongnesses, which I justified to my editors along-the-way as being tiny pieces of a huge "Lost"-like mosaic leading-up to a grand mystery, but are in fact just pernicious acts of narrative mischief. I consider this a glorious transcendent artwork! A smashing-down of the invisible cages which box your minds! A breaking-free from the shackles of continuity in whose neurotic loops we have all willingly enmeshed ourselves! A nihilistic experiment to demolish all illusion of verity in fictional personality!' -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"Worth saying: this stuff is going on in the real world all the time. Unmanned predator drones, civilian spying software, undeclared special-ops missions, off grid aeronautical technology, cyber invasion, bloody radioactive sushi! Switch on the news, brothers and sisters, we are adrift upon a world of shadowy espionage far more elaborate and vituperative than the most insane James Bondian excesses." -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"Our initial aim was to deliberately sidestep the obvious route of having X-Force fighting Recognizable-Returned-Supervillain #4367 from the get-go, and instead demonstrate what a real bad guy looks like. That is, an irritating little prick in bad clothes, with an extraordinary amount of political power, who literally does not give a **** about anyone below a certain level of importance. As a villain, Volga is simply a distillation of the sorts of people who control all of our lives." -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"There's this really funny paradox when it comes to lesser-known characters. Everyone's got their weird little favorites but they'll react with incredulity to everyone else's. Weirder still, we often haven't thought too deeply about why we've got these odd fixations on certain characters: they just suggest themselves like old friends and we can't quite shake the inexplicable certainty of their thunderous AWESOMENESS despite all evidence and claims to the contrary. For me it usually comes down to inventive weirdness (e.g. Maggott) or sheer visual interest (e.g. Chamber) -- but when I got the chance to include a real Didn't-See-That-Coming character in X-Force my brain went straight to Marrow." -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"The other interesting thing, when you get into inventing new characters from other countries, is trying to avoid really clunky clichés. Like... say you're inventing a character from Norway? What does everyone know about Norway? Vikings! Norse Gods! So let's put him in a spiky helmet and call him Edda!

"Orrrrr we could be less lazy and rubbish, put him in a sensible outfit and call him Captain Top-Of-The-Human-Development-Index-Charts, or Expensive Beer Guy, or Sergeant Fjord Cruises, or Problematic Whaling Policy Man... or... or...

"Anyway. I digress. Just a personal bugbear of mine. People very rarely define themselves according to the ancient history local to their nation -- I don't imagine many heroes and villains would either."
-- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"I tend to imagine [Psylocke's] childhood -- raised in extreme wealth and privilege -- has given her the sort of fascinating reverse-sensitivity for class, poverty and societal fairness one occasionally sees in spoilt brattish kids. She's the Siddhartha of the mutant set: the social warrior who feels the suffering of others most keenly precisely because she was raised so far beyond its reach." -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"[The book] is about Spurrier's First Rule: factions speak louder than herds." -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime


The return of ForgetMeNot, the X-Men whose power is that nobody can remember him...

'The MU is a violent place. That's something I suspect a lot of readers unthinkingly overlook (another clever subconscious act of self-trickery, perhaps). We use terms like "all-action!" and "then they battle!" because it distinguishes the depicted violence from the real thing, which by the way is sordid and unbeautiful and uncinematic, and if you've ever been unlucky enough to witness true physical destruction then it festers in the mind of the beholder like a psychic cancer . . . I kind of decided that if any book was going to go spelunking for some value in reminding readers of the truth -- that scenes including violence are automatically about violence -- then [X-Force]'d be the one . . . You don't get to enjoy a book about violence without it occasionally turning 'round to bite you on the arse. Sorry.' - Si Spurrier

Read more... )
superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime


X-Men Legacy has had a weird history. It started as basically a book starring Charles Xavier. Then, it turned into a book starring Rogue. Then finally it was a book starring Xavier's son Legion.

So, naturally, the grand issue #300, the series finale, gives us a story... that's not about any of them.

The final issue )
sherkahn: (Weeping Angel)
[personal profile] sherkahn
BleedingCool.com has the updates as to thefllout of Avengers Vs. X-men (I am so tired of saying that) but this one may be a doozy (if not predictable).

SPOILERS BEHIND THE CUT.

Legacy.  )
nomadicwriter: Judge Dredd and Galen DeMarco about to kiss (Dredd/DeMarco)
[personal profile] nomadicwriter
Part two of my history of Galen DeMarco, continued from here.

Where we left off last time, partway through "Beyond the Call of Duty", DeMarco was making a spirited attempt at going where no woman has gone before. Here's how that worked out for her.

Roughly 22 pages of scans under the cut.

Dredd's reaction, and what happened next )

Still one of my very favourite characters. ♥

Profile

scans_daily: (Default)
Scans Daily
Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

Bottom line: If slash, feminism or anti-oppressive practice makes you react negatively, [community profile] scans_daily is probably not for you.

Please read the community ethos and rules before posting or commenting.

December 2014

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21222324252627
28293031   

Most Popular Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags