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[personal profile] starwolf_oakley
For some reason, seeing pages of CIVIL WAR II: THE OATH and hearing about the upcoming SECRET EMPIRE story got me thinking about the first Nomad Story. Specifically a part of the end.



CAPTAIN AMERICA #183 took place while Steve Rogers was the Nomad. (He was depressed that Number One of the Secret Empire turned out to be a high-ranking White House official who might have been Richard Nixon, who knows?)

Hero, fool, failure )
starwolf_oakley: (Default)
[personal profile] starwolf_oakley
AVENGERS #0 showed that the Vision has altered his own mind so that when he remembers Wanda, he isn't affected by any emotions that go with it. Kind of what Rogue did to Carol Danvers by accident, the Vision did to himself on purpose, so every time he sees Wanda he won't want to lie down and die.

But...

70s fun revisitied. )
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[personal profile] informationgeek
jurassicparkraptor2cover

Writer: Steve Englehart
Pencils/Inks: Armando Gil
Other Penciller/Inker: Dell Barras

10 out of 30 pages

Read More... )
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[personal profile] informationgeek
jurassicparkraptor1cover

Tagline on the cover: "The Official Continuation of the Hit Movie!"

Writer: Steve Englehart
Pencils/Inks: Armando Gil
Other Penciller/Inker: Dell Barras

10 out of 30 pages

Read More... )
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[personal profile] starwolf_oakley
SPECIAL MARVEL EDITION #16 is the second appearances of Shang Chi, and ends with a brutal battle between Shang Chi and his foster brother M'Nai, a.k.a. Midnight.

Crane fight! )
skjam: Man in blue suit and fedora, wearing an eyeless mask emblazoned with the scales of justice (Default)
[personal profile] skjam
Hi folks!

Captain America has fought many enemies over the years, and a surprising number of them have also been "Captain America." These twisted reflections of our hero represent America's fear that we aren't who we want to be, the best of the America spirit. Instead, they are distorted by hatred and greed, the America we do not want to be.



This is the story of one such man, Fifties Cap. This story is from Captain America #155 in 1972; six pages of twenty.

The man who would be Steve Rogers )

Your thoughts and comments?

SKJAM!
http://www.skjam.com
skjam: Man in blue suit and fedora, wearing an eyeless mask emblazoned with the scales of justice (Default)
[personal profile] skjam
Hi folks, let's go back to 1974 and the country of Vietnam. A country that had seen far too much war, and was about to see more.



"Wait," you say, "The Slasher? Who he?" He's also known as Buzzsaw and Razorblade, and this is his debut appearance. Six pages of eighteen in Avengers #130.

The Reality Problem! )

Interesting trivia: Bill Mantlo did the colors for this issue.

Your thoughts and comments?
SKJAM!
http://www.skjam.com
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[personal profile] starwolf_oakley
In a post about AVENGERS ASSEMBLE #20, http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/4544954.html , Wonder Man and the Wasp argued about disabling the ships Thanos' forces were using. The question was would "disabling" the ship kill the aliens inside.
This reminded me of something I heard about happening in GREEN LANTERN during CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS.

The morality of war when all of reality is at stake )
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[personal profile] icon_uk
Okay, to my own surprise, this is the next in my list of my "Accentuate the Positive" posts, and it features some of my least favourite art.... weird huh?



Anyway, this is from Malibu Comics Ultraverse, the comic company that Marvel don't like to talk about any more.

The Ultraverse started in the early 90's, with a slew of titles, some good, some not so good (IMHO of course) but had set up an interesting universe for itself. It was then bought up by Marvel Comics, who did a few crossovers which were forgettable or actively not good and no one likes to remember (and for good reason) and then the whole thing sort of got forgotten, which is a shame.

Sometimes a good character hook will get you through a LOT of bad art )
causticlad: Matter-Eater Lad doing his cracky thing (Default)
[personal profile] causticlad


Marshall Rogers and Steve Englehart were in a select group of people that revitalized Batman in the 1970s. The pairing of Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams was first and probably more famous, but the artist Rogers and writer Englehart had a highly influential short run on Batman during the mid-70s that more or less defined how the character was written and drawn well into the 21st century.

Englehart and Rogers were something of a dynamic duo themselves, working together on a mid-70s revival of Miracle Man for a while, as well one of DC's earliest direct distribution comics (the one-shot Madam Xanadu) and on early indie comic Coyote for Eclipse. Their longest run together, however, was on a mid-80s revamping of the Silver Surfer.

From his first appearance in 1966 to the printing of this story in 1987 (Silver Surfer vol 3, #1), the Surfer had been trapped on Earth. Englehart had a penchant for cosmic-scale stories and spent issue one of the new series liberating Galactus' ex-herald so he could get down to writing some. After hearing that his ex-boss' new gofer, Nova, has been captured by the Skrulls in an attempt to weaponize the World-Eater by extorting him into eating the Kree Empire, the Surfer uses a temporary escape from Earth to negotiate his permanent release. Nova has been stashed in a facility with plotnecessitium vibranium walls that are primed to blow if damaged. Slow and ponderous as he is, Galactus will only kill Nova if he tries to rescue her. The Surfer is a different matter, though. If he gets Nova back, Galactus promises to stop acting like a spoiled child and will let him go on his way.

This leads to a virtuoso stretch of pencilling from Rogers, whose background before coming into comics was in architectural drawing. His sci-fi buildings always rather looked like real buildings, and for this he basically "plotted out" a Skrull facility for...well, look at it yourself:

Maybe if I take a run at it? )
starwolf_oakley: (Default)
[personal profile] starwolf_oakley
CAPTAIN AMERICA #183 took place while Steve Rogers was the Nomad. (He was depressed that Number One of the Secret Empire turned out to be Richard Nix -uh, I mean a high-ranking White House official.)



My WORD that is an unusual last panel on that page.

Read more... )
wizardru: Hellboy (Default)
[personal profile] wizardru


I've been going through my comics and inventorying them and selecting what to sell...so I've come across lots of stuff, lately. Here's one I forgot about.

So the year was 2001 and the title was "Fantastic Four: Bigtown". The conceit of this "What If..." story is a simple one. What if Tony Stark and Reed Richards actually went ahead and changed the world? The results are....not what you'd expect.
Read more... )
thanekos: Yoshikage Kira as Kosaku Kawajiri, after the second arrow. (Default)
[personal profile] thanekos
In Fantastic Four: Big Town, Reed Richards fixed everything.

Of course, he really didn't. Sure, he and the other smart guys got together and made the world better, but you really can't spend four issues examining Tony Stark's overhauling of public transportation or Spider-Man as licensed brand.

You've got to have conflict in Arcadia; luckily, there's an all-star lineup of serpents to act out vengeance.

And three guesses who's leading the pack that stands in opposition to Reed's idea of the future.. )
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[personal profile] thehefner
First things first: who here *hasn't* read the Batman story arc Strange Apparitions (the legendary comic arc by Steve Englehart, most famous for including the all-time great Joker story, The Laughing Fish)?

If you haven't--or if you've only read Fish on its own but not the surrounding story--you should at least know that it's generally considered one of the finest Batman stories of all time. I certainly agree, but I don't want to oversell it as a work, since hyped expectations have killed many a great story. I can at least safely presume to call it one of the most important and influential Batman comics of all time, and for that alone I urge you to track down the trade paperback.

Or at least, I would, if it weren't out of print. WTF, DC?

I was actually tempted to post the entire storyline here, but I had a hard enough time singling out the Hugo Strange subplot while keeping these scans under the 1/3rd limit. The story is just that tight, with each issue packed to the gills with plot, action, and character stuff.

So with regret, let's eschew the excellent stories of Bruce and Silver St. Cloud's affair, of the introduction of Dr. Phosphorus and the reintroduction of Deadshot, of the thieving Penguin and tragic Clayface III, and even of the greatest Joker scheme of all time.

Instead, let's focus on the grand return of Batman's first arch-nemesis, and the scheming villain who made the damn fool mistake of crossing him:





At least, they do for now... )

If you'd like to read all of Strange Apparitions yourself, I wish you the best of luck. As previously stated, this beloved classic is bizarrely out of print. If you're up for scouring back issue bins and/or the internet, the story's been collected in trade paperback, which itself is a collection of the five-issue miniseries Shadow of the Batman, which reprinted the original issues. Basically, find it any way you can until DC comes to their senses.

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