alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


So I was going to post the conclusion to the Music Master's first case, but eh...after a while one MM story begins to seem pretty much like the next. Instead, I bring you this very cracky four-page PSA for war bonds, from Reg'lar Fellers Heroic Comics #15 (Nov. 1942). Scans for this public domain work are courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com.

Trigger warning for the usual sort of WWII-era racist caricaturing.

'Now we'll go to Europe...on wings of song!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


Dipping once again into John Morris's recently-published book, The League of Regrettable Superheroes, for inspiration, I present one of the most...creative premises the genre has ever seen: a hero who gets his super-powers from--a panflute!

So let's see how this plays out (*ba-DUM TSSHH*) )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



Doctor Hormone and Jane, back home in America, head to Washington to help the government ward off an invasion from "Nazia." This time, they get to face off as well against another foe, portrayed every bit as true-to-life as the previous. *cough*

'For I'm a jolly good fifth columnist' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



I can only suppose that since America wasn't yet at war in 1940, the publisher wished to avoid giving offence to a certain real-life totalitarian regime.

Which is no doubt why the guards swear in fake German )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



Assinoff has used his mighty donkey strength to flee Novoslavia, taking Dr. Hormone's granddaughter Jane as hostage. His objective? Enticing him into entering Eurasia's service.

Yeah, kidnapping the grandkid is a great way to do that, harem hotties notwithstanding )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


In the last issue, Dr. Hormone successfully bumbled through a secret air mission which hormonally transformed the invading Urasian army into loyal Novoslavian citizens. But the war isn't over yet.

'Look fellows, I can fly...almost!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


Master of understatement, that premier

Doctor Hormone, he of upstanding medical ethics, has chemically transformed boys into an army of full-grown Novoslavian men. But will that be enough to withstand the Soviet Eurasian "Urasian" invasion, and the waning patience of Novoslavia's top general?

Let's find out )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


Good-hearted but methodologically problematic Doctor Hormone, American, uses his scientific genius to protect vulnerable nations from invasion by barely-veiled Soviet and Nazi German analogues. How? Why, with hormones of course. Also with the help of his annoying but loyal granddaughter, the "shouldn't she be in school"-aged Jane. Created by artist (and writer?) Robert Bugg, Doctor Hormone appeared in Popular Comics Issues 54 through 60 (1940-41), and has never been seen since. Now in the public domain (scans courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com), here's the first of the Doc's bizarre adventures, from Issue 54 (Aug 1940).

'After this, I'll stop cradle-snatching!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


'And I'm totally not saying that so my head will stay attached to my body, O Golden Horus.'



There's an old Jewish joke that all of our holy days can be summarized as "They tried to kill us; we survived; let's eat!" This definitely applies to the festival that began last night, Passover (especially the eating part...oy). To celebrate, here's a story from a Golden Age, better-than-average Bible comic, Tales from the Great Book #4 (January 1956, Eastern Color Printing; script and art by John Lehti). This comic is in the public domain; scans are courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com.


13 pages of court intrigue, daring escapes, convenient deaths, and, er, creative license with history )

Happy Passover (Hag Sameach) to everyone celebrating it.
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Now that we've relived Identity Crisis (and survived to tell of it), let's take a trip back to the Golden Age, when members of the JLA's predecessor underwent their own, somewhat different crises of identity. This issue-length Gardner Fox story, from All Star Comics #30 (Aug-Sept 1946), is so delightfully cracky it took four artists to illustrate it. It previously appeared, way back when, on s_d 1.0, so no better time to post it again.

'As a sponge, I belong in this sink.' )
aeka: (Huntress [modcon]:)
[personal profile] aeka
I honestly had trouble with this one. Because in truth? There is more than one character I'd like to see come back from the dead.

The characters I speak of all populated a world that was originally five decades old. They lived on a world where the first superheroes appeared and united during World War II and formed the first superhero team in the history of superhero teams. These were the characters that aged in real time, married, and had families of their own. Their own children eventually took over their jobs as superheroes once they were old and retired or had passed on after a long, fruitful life. Their own legacy even led the arrival of a new generation of superheroes that were more diverse than their predecessors.

I am of course, talking about the pre-Crisis Earth-2 in all its Golden Age glory! )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




For my final horror-themed post of the month, here's a Basil Wolverton creeper from Gillmor's Weird Mysteries #5 (June 1953). Public domain; thanks once again to ComicBookPlus.com for the scans.

I can do a much better job than a plastic surgeon! )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Another cheesy chiller from Harvey's Chamber of Chills (public domain). This one's from #3 (Oct 1951). Art and, possibly, script by Bob Powell, with art assists from Howard Nostrand and Marvil Epp (whose name is on the tombstone in page 8). Trigger warning for suicide.

Cobwebs and castles and corneas, oh my! )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Harvey Comics is best remembered as a publisher of kids' comics, but like MLJ/Archie, there was a time it dealt in a variety of genres, including horror, giving that up only when the establishment of the Comics Code Authority in 1954 put an end to stories such as the one I present here in its entirety, from Chamber of Chills #7 (April 1952; scans of this public domain title courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com). The gruesome denouement of "Crawling Death" (writer unknown, art by Abe Simon and Don Perlin) got special mention in Wertham's Seduction of the Innocent. Trigger warning for gore.

Typical human reaction: 'I'm going to kill it!! It might be some rare species!!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




The final Golden Age appearance of Madam Satan, from Pep #21 (Nov 1941; public domain), finds our villain attempting to damn two men at once. Will she succeed?

I think we all know the answer to that, but for old times' sake... )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In this two-parter from Pep #18 and #19 (Aug-Sept 1941; public domain), our villain learns to change up her strategy a bit from merely seducing men and trying to give them the death-kiss. Does it work? Let's find out!

She's an unholy creature, I tell you! )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Madam Satan, formerly the murderous mortal woman Tyra and now going by Iola for some reason, receives her first assignment from her infernal mate and boss. From Pep #17 (July 1941; public domain). Art by Harry Lucey, script possibly by Joe Blair (according to the Grand Comics Database).

I seem to have a premonition of something evil! )

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