sindra: (ecclesia)
[personal profile] sindra
With the last Nintendo Power magazine having been releases earlier this year, much to the dismay and sadness to us oldschool gamers from back when the magazine was something coveted as the "Go To" source for video gaming back in the 1990's. With it came a comic featuring the more-or-less mascot of the magazine itself - Nester.

NESter was a teenaged gamer, who would often act as the promoter for new games, and would have game-based adventures. He became synonymous with the magazine, and even those without Nintendo Power magazine subscription most likely knew who Nester was.

Well, Nester grew up with us......


Thus Ends an Era..... )

skjam: Man in blue suit and fedora, wearing an eyeless mask emblazoned with the scales of justice (Default)
[personal profile] skjam
Been meaning to post one of these for a while. "Helvetica Standard" is a monthly strip published in Newtype Magazine and created by Kei'ichi Arawi, who also does "Nichijou." The latter manga has become an anime series--here's an AMV inspired by it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-Z9PKIOEwI

And now the strip itself, from Newtype April 2012 )

Your thoughts and comments?
skjam: (Imnanna)
[personal profile] skjam
Back in 1994, Magic: The Gathering was new and shiny and the biggest obsession of geeks nationwide. The industry followed the leader, and a bunch of similar collectible card games (some pretty good) came out. Clearly it was time for a magazine dedicated to the phenomenon.



This issue has rules errata, frequently asked questions, deck building advice...but most importantly from this community's perspective, a comic!

Phil and Dixie are back! )

Your thoughts, comments, favorite collectible card game story?"
skjam: Skyler Sands as a UNIT soldier (Unit)
[personal profile] skjam
Back in the late 80s/early 90s, Japan's economy was doing pretty well. Indeed, there was even concern among alarmists that Japan would be able to simply buy America out, at last "winning WWII." Reality kicked in when the economic bubble burst, but for a while there it was good business to learn some Japanese.

And thus there was Mangajin, a magazine to help young business people learn about the Japanese language through the medium of comics.



We'll be looking at five pages, each an individual strip. I should mention that the print is kind of tiny in the translation notes, so you might want to have your zoom function handy.

From the land of clear blue waters...comes the beer refreshing, comes the beer refreshing... )

Your thoughts and comments?

SKJAM!
skund: (Default)
[personal profile] skund
TV Hits is an Australian teen pop culture magazine published by a company owned by Yahoo, and is just as tasteless and horrible as it sounds. They've put out a 2010 diary with a rather specific theme...

The horror, let me show it to you... )
[identity profile] skjam.insanejournal.com
Punch magazine was founded in 1841, and enjoyed over a century as a weekly humor magazine, satirical but not "low." It was immensely popular and influential in its day, featuring many famous cartoonists and humor writers.

By the time I was in England, Punch was long past its glory days, and would cease publication in 1992, but I still found it amusing enough to save an issue or two. Here's some bits from the July 13, 1983 issue.





Much of the early Punch output is in the public domain, one site that may be of interest is http://www.punchcartoons.com/ .
[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com
John Byrne really came along toward my cut-off date for comics, so I've seen a good amount of his work but I never really followed it... in the sense of reading each issue as it came out, wondering what was going to happen, that sort of thing. His art seemed more creative and less rushed than it later became (was he inking with a magic marker or what?). Anyway, I know who he is and like his early stuff. But he was in his day the hottest thing in American super-hero comics.



This page is from FANDOM CONFIDENTIAL, a 1982 collection of one pagers done by Jim Engel and Chuck Fiala for THE COMIC READER. These were usually a series of photos of the guys, complete with comic book-style dialogue balloons and inked-in special effects. They ranted about current comics, interviewed Superman (a cardboard stand-up from a movie theatre) or Woody Woodpecker (a hand puppet), and they were consistently funny in the twisted affectionate way fans can be. Here they go to meet Byrne, and we see him at work in his home.

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Scans Daily
Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

Bottom line: If slash, feminism or anti-oppressive practice makes you react negatively, [community profile] scans_daily is probably not for you.

Please read the community ethos and rules before posting or commenting.

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