alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



As dedicated an objectivist as Ditko has been, bringing the world such sombre and verbose ideologue heroes as Mr. A and the Question, he's also recognized that comic books should still be, well, comic at least some of the time. So it was that during his time at Charlton, he created the satirical strip Killjoy, which ran as a backup feature in E-Man nos. 2 (Sept. 1973) and 4 (May 1974).

The premise was simple: silent superhero Killjoy captures a criminal, then disappears and (it's implied) reappears in one civilian guise or another. The criminal and his or her minions weep and wail over Killjoy's violation of their inalienable right to commit crimes, as do the liberal activists Mr. Hart and Mr. Sole. Lather, rinse, repeat with other criminals.

Subtlety? What's that? )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In my previous post, [personal profile] sindra pointed out that the victim's retribution on the protagonist was disproportionate, in that he claimed he merely wanted to teach him a lesson, via a "Hollywood Voodoo" (i.e., not real-life Voudon) spell, but in fact ended up killing him via reverse ageing. Instead, sindra argued, the protagonist should've been punished in a way that would spare his life and allow him to mend his ways.

My initial response was "Then it wouldn't be a horror story!" But then I remembered "A Spell of Misery!" from the obscure Charlton comic, Creepy Things (#2, Oct 1975), in which a villainous protagonist also finds himself on the receiving end of a "Hollywood Voodoo" spell, but gets a second chance to make amends. (Script: Joe Gill, art: Rich Larson.) The story even has a socially-relevant topic: the deplorable living conditions in inner-city slums. Unfortunately, like many a well-meaning "social relevance" story from the Bronze Age of comics, it contains flagrant racial stereotypes. Consider this a trigger warning.

Don't mess with Mama Carafino )
majingojira: (Godzilla Burnination)
[personal profile] majingojira
For 25 issues, the monster Gorgo had her own comic series.  That's even longer than Marvel's Godzilla (by a single issue).

A movie that a lot of giant monster fans love, loaded with symbolism regarding the political "Troubles" of Northern Ireland and suggested by Leonard Maltin (who gave it 3 stars) for Mystery Science Theater 3000.

Lets take a look.

ROOOOAAAAAR! )
[identity profile] zegas.insanejournal.com
Ditko

To celebrate Halloween this year, I've posted a bunch of my favorite Steve Ditko horror comics covers, all from his Charlton days. I never seem to remember that Ditko's birthday is a couple of days after Halloween (On Nov. 2nd, he turns 82).Well, I remembered this time, and although there isn't a terribly strong connection between both of these themes, it's more reason to post some Ditko. Additionally, one of his classic collaborations with Archie Goodwin, "Room With a View", is also included here. Just follow the cut for horror covers and comics at their finest.

Ditko's Horror Comics )
kingrockwell: he's a sexy (Default)
[personal profile] kingrockwell

Intermission: Hangin' With Beetle (pt 1)
with special bonus: Vic Walks In Two Worlds

In 1981, after thirteen years of surviving on licensed comics, Charlton was falling apart. A new volume of Charlton Bullseye was launched to feature new talent and hopefully strike gold, and the first issue went to writer Benjamin Smith and artist Dan Reed, who decided the thing Charlton needed was something it already had.

kingrockwell: he's a sexy (Default)
[personal profile] kingrockwell

Ditko: Vic the Enforcer (pt 2)

I may be vacationing out of state, but I still found time between hanging around with the family to crop up Mysterious Suspense #1 for you guys.
kingrockwell: he's a sexy (Default)
[personal profile] kingrockwell

Ditko: Vic the Enforcer (pt 1)

In the mid-60s, after his falling out with Marvel, Steve Ditko returned to Charlton, for whom he'd earlier co-created Captain Atom. In addition to working on that character, Ditko created two new ones who would prove to be among the more enduring of the Charlton heroes, and he featured them in the same book. Carrying the title was Ted Kord, Ditko's successor to the classic Fox Features Hero, but it isn't Ted that brings us here today.

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