alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



Doctor Hormone and Jane, back home in America, head to Washington to help the government ward off an invasion from "Nazia." This time, they get to face off as well against another foe, portrayed every bit as true-to-life as the previous. *cough*

'For I'm a jolly good fifth columnist' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



I can only suppose that since America wasn't yet at war in 1940, the publisher wished to avoid giving offence to a certain real-life totalitarian regime.

Which is no doubt why the guards swear in fake German )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



Assinoff has used his mighty donkey strength to flee Novoslavia, taking Dr. Hormone's granddaughter Jane as hostage. His objective? Enticing him into entering Eurasia's service.

Yeah, kidnapping the grandkid is a great way to do that, harem hotties notwithstanding )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


In the last issue, Dr. Hormone successfully bumbled through a secret air mission which hormonally transformed the invading Urasian army into loyal Novoslavian citizens. But the war isn't over yet.

'Look fellows, I can fly...almost!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


Master of understatement, that premier

Doctor Hormone, he of upstanding medical ethics, has chemically transformed boys into an army of full-grown Novoslavian men. But will that be enough to withstand the Soviet Eurasian "Urasian" invasion, and the waning patience of Novoslavia's top general?

Let's find out )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


Good-hearted but methodologically problematic Doctor Hormone, American, uses his scientific genius to protect vulnerable nations from invasion by barely-veiled Soviet and Nazi German analogues. How? Why, with hormones of course. Also with the help of his annoying but loyal granddaughter, the "shouldn't she be in school"-aged Jane. Created by artist (and writer?) Robert Bugg, Doctor Hormone appeared in Popular Comics Issues 54 through 60 (1940-41), and has never been seen since. Now in the public domain (scans courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com), here's the first of the Doc's bizarre adventures, from Issue 54 (Aug 1940).

'After this, I'll stop cradle-snatching!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




It's fitting that I close this series of John Stanley horror stories with what may be his creepiest one ever, from Dell's Ghost Stories #1 (Sept-Nov 1962). Art by Ed Robbins. This issue is in the public domain; scans courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com.

Like a rattler the claw strikes )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Writer John Stanley is best known for two things: his longtime run on Little Lulu and his authorship of the Dell horror comics Tales from the Tomb (one-shot giant, 1962) and Ghost Stories #1 (Sept-Nov 1962). Some have called the latter two the scariest comic books ever published. Are they? You be the judge, over the next few posts o' mine. To start with, here's the Tales from the Tomb lead story. Art by Frank Springer. This comic is in the public domain (scans courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com).

Oh dear! Just look at those stains! )
sandoz_iscariot: A young man looks thoughtful, his chin resting on his hand. (Beatles: *Bats Eyelashes*)
[personal profile] sandoz_iscariot
In honor of what would have been John Lennon's 70th birthday today, here are scans from a Beatles biography comic book published by Dell in 1964. Jelly babies! Fake beards! John's one terrifying creepface!



it's been a hard day's night )
skjam: Man in blue suit and fedora, wearing an eyeless mask emblazoned with the scales of justice (Default)
[personal profile] skjam
Tonight's offering is "Dr. Kildare" #2 (July-Sept 1962).

Dr. Kildare started as a series of films in the late 1930s-early '40s, with writer Max Brand (you may know him better for his Westerns), who also wrote a paperback novelization of at least one of the movies, "Young Dr. Kildare." Jimmy Kildare was a young, idealistic interne who came from a small town background to the big city hospital to study as a diagnostician under the famed Dr. Gillespie. About halfway through the series, the star left, and the remaining films were refocused around Dr. Gillespie and new internes. One of those was played by Keye Luke, which might be relevant in light of this issue's story.

In 1961, the property was turned into a TV series starring Richard Chamberlain as the title character. The handsome young actor skyrocketed to stardom (kind of like George Clooney with ER, for you younger folks.) At the beginning of the series, wise Dr. Gillespie warned Jimmy Kildare "doctors save people's lives; we don't tell them how to live them", but of course Dr. Kildare got personally involved time and time again.

Note that Dr. Kildare's comic book costs three cents more than Ben Casey's. )

Remember what I said last time about Dell comics being outside the Comics Code, due to their wholesome rep? Well, this allowed them to do some stories that wouldn't have flown over at DC or Marvel for another ten years, when those companies caught the social relevance bug. 10 2/3rds pages of 32.

Skin Deep )

Your thoughts, medical nit-picks, and comments?

suggested tags
publisher: Dell Publishing
theme: doctors and nurses
theme: racism
title: Dr. Kildare
skjam: Man in blue suit and fedora, wearing an eyeless mask emblazoned with the scales of justice (Default)
[personal profile] skjam
Whilst I was visiting my folks in upstate Minnesota this holiday season, we visited a thrift store, where I stumbled across a couple of doctor comics from the early 1960s. Naturally, I thought of you folks.

The first up is "Ben Casey" #2, the October 1962 issue. The "Ben Casey" show ran from 1961 through 1966, produced by Bing Crosby Productions and airing on ABC. The title character, an intense and idealistic young neurosurgeon, was portrayed by Vincent Edwards. His wise mentor was Dr. David Zorba, played by Sam Jaffe. Each episode opened with Dr. Zorba intoning the words up there in my post title, while a hand wrote the symbol for each on a chalkboard.

This cover looks back at you. )

And now, our feature presentation, 8 1/3 pages of 25:
Bite the Hand.. )

And now a short feature, 1 1/3 pages of four.

Dial Emergency... )

And to round off this post, a vintage ad.

Here for the painful wordplay )

Next time, Dr. Kildare!

Your thoughts, comments, medical nitpicks?

suggested tags:
publisher: Dell Publishing
theme: doctors and nurses
title: Ben Casey
[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com


Here's a few samples from the first issue of YAK YAK in 1961, from Dell (there would be a second issue in 1962, not a sign of fevered public demand for this material). Weird comic. No ads, and some of the art was in regular four color but most was an odd experiment. The figures were left white, while the rest of the panels were light blue or pink or green. No borders on the panels and the dialogue was in rectangular balloons. It might not have been very good but it was distinctive. This was a style we later saw split-off Gold Key use on DR SOLAR.

Whether he was doing humor or horror, adventure or Westerns, Davis was always unique and enjoyable. Too bad the writing on this was so weak.

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