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IMAGE COMICS: In this series, a tornado brings the divine right to the heart of the mundane. Where do we go from here? Are you going to keep a balance of the two, or push our normal characters deep into divine conflict?

DONNY CATES: This is a story about the Quinlan family first and foremost. The Quinlans are just simple people trying to get by and they could honestly care less for the schemes and machinations of higher beings. I think that balance between the high and the low, the celestial and the country, is what makes the book special.

These immense beings coming down to earth, proclaiming their lineage and how powerful they are—only to be confronted with the Quinlans, telling them to get off their land because it's private property. That kind of thing is so fun for me.

To put it succinctly, these gods mess with Texas. And, well...we're not overly fond of that kind of thing 'round these parts.


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Fathom #1

Feb. 10th, 2017 11:25 am
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Scans under the cut... )

Don't know what to tag this with so I did Image as they were the original publisher way back.

1963 #2

Dec. 11th, 2016 09:12 pm
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"I'd been working outside super-heroes for a long time. When I returned to them I felt that I'd probably prefer that super-heroes have all of the energy that I remember from the comics of my youth; sort of less of that misery that Watchmen, in part, had brought to them. So yeah, that was probably part of the decision to have some fun with an older style of comics in 1963."

- Alan Moore


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1963 #1

Dec. 10th, 2016 09:31 pm
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THE JACK KIRBY COLLECTOR: What exactly made those classic Marvel stories so revolutionary? Was it that the storytelling was more mature than DC?

ALAN MOORE: An extra dimension had been added to both the storytelling and the art. In a sense the DC characters at the time were archetypes to a certain degree. Archetype means they are one-dimensional. Stan Lee and his collaborators in terms of the story overlaid a second dimension of character. He gave them a few human problems. These weren't three-dimensional characters but they were of a dimension more than what we'd been used to, and something about the art kind of corresponded with that. With Kirby there was a level of attention to detail and texture and intensity about the art that seemed to give another dimension to the super-hero—to the comic book—than what was used at the time. It just seemed to be much more visceral, much more real. The Human Torch finding the Sub-Mariner in a bowery slum; that kind of had a visceral reality to it that was much more engaging.


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Reborn #1

Nov. 13th, 2016 09:06 pm
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"It’s one of those universal things that regardless of what faith you have, or if you have no faith at all, or whatever country you live in, at some point, kind of in the back of your mind you’re like, where do we go? It just seemed kind of fun to come up with the answer."

- Mark Millar


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