alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In this goofy but still very much relevant satire (which even predicts, in passing, the subject becoming a reality TV star), the underground cartoonist faces off against the man many of us wish were just a cartoon.

Note: brief (verbal) rape "joke."

'You're a highly literate S.O.B., aren'tcha?!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




H.P. Lovecraft's classic 1924 tale of horrific family secrets gets the Richard Corben (as, appropriately, "Gore") treatment in the underground comic Skull #5 (Last Gasp, 1972).

3 of 10 pages; NSFW for gore )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


Back cover of Fat Freddy's Cat #1 (1988)

Hey cats, and cats' owners servants humans! Ever been frustrated by your inability to communicate with each other? Well, Fat Freddy Freekowtski (of the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers), and his cat he was apparently too lazy to name, can identify with you.

Is that all you can say? 'Meow?' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



From the cover of Wimmen's Comix #4 (1974; art by Shelby Sampson)


By 1970, the underground comix field had come into its own as a creators' alternative to Comics Code restrictions on language, art and subject matter. This freer, "anything goes" environment was a positive development for comic books overall (otherwise I wouldn't be making all these posts about it). But it also had a darker side: an increased emphasis on content that was brutally degrading to women, and the exclusion of women creators from the most popular comix titles.


Feminist cartoonists to the rescue! (Trigger warning for sexism/misogyny) )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



From the cover of Mystic Funnies #1 (1997)



We can't talk about underground comix without mentioning its most well-known and influential creator, R. (Robert) Crumb. In 1968, his Zap Comix was the first underground title really to tap into the hippie/freak zeitgeist and achieve commercial success, paving the way for hundreds more titles by a variety of cartoonists. Although many of his colleagues and readers have rightly called him out for the unabashed misogyny, dehumanizing sexuality, and insensitively "ironic" use of racial caricature in his work, there's still much within Crumb's output worth reading. Among his wittiest stories are those starring the half-wise, half-huckster guru Mr. Natural and his long-suffering, neurotic student, Flakey Foont.


Who are you? )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



What was the first underground comic? Historians differ on this question, but some say it was a photocopied, somewhat irreverent (blasphemous?) 1962 collection of strips about a certain Galilean preacher, cautiously credited to one "F.S." and hand-distributed on a Texas college campus.

Read more )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher

Back cover of The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers #1

In 1971, the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers got their own, self-titled series, published by Gilbert Shelton's own Rip Off Press. This allowed the trio more space to score dope, get high, avoid having to (ugh) work, and evade the authorities, particularly their nemesis, bumbling Drug Enforcement Agency inspector Norbert the Nark (sic).

Stickin' it to the Man )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher
In the spring of 1968, writer/artist Gilbert Shelton, already somewhat known in college humour and underground comix circles for his Superman parody Wonder Wart-Hog, self-published a 28-page one-shot, Feds 'n' Heads Comics. Along with that porcine hero, the comic featured a variety of whimsical strips about hippies, freaks and above all drugs--and introduced the trio that would become Shelton's most famous creation: The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers.

Set your chickens free! (NSFW for brief male nudity) )
[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com
A typically clever page from Art Spiegelman. He may be best remembered for the powerful allegory MAUS, but most of his work involves a playful use of comics as jigsaw puzzles. This is from ARCADE: THE COMICS REVUE# 2, Summer 1975.


[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com
My favorite creator from the Golden Age of Undergrounds, Gilbert Shelton (here aided and abetted by Tony Bell), with Wonder Wart-Hog back in the age of dinosaurs. Not only do we see a Tyrannosaur whose teeth have been knocked out by a fighting-mad super-powered humanoid wart-hog (and how often does THAT happen), not only do we learn how snakes actually lost their legs (it was not millions of years of evolution, as we have been led to believe)... but we see the ancestor of a famous Muppet and the first recorded instance of a famous sound effect. How much history can one page hold?

[identity profile] peur_evol.insanejournal.com


Further entries in this series: "Comix In Unexpected Places™= "1970s Albums, Adult Magazines, Action Figure Packaging, Newspapers, Cereal Boxes, AND MORE !!!"
You'll be surprised !!
[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com
You know, I was going to say the X-Men look weirder than these denizens of the underground, but on second thought, maybe not. This is the cover by Rand Holmes to the 1974 book A HISTORY OF UNDERGROUND COMICS by Mark James Estren. Let's see who's at the party.


[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com
Dude, learn to pace yourself. Anyway, this inspirational poster is from Jim Mitchell's 1971 underground SMILE
[identity profile] peur_evol.insanejournal.com


Just a sample from one of the few online comics that are not anti-drug. I wouldn't call Mr. Yungbluth an advocate exactly, but he's admitted to using pot himself and seems to be pro-choice when it comes to controlled substances.

[identity profile] dr_hermes.insanejournal.com


A Zen moment which had been up at the old homestead but I think it merits being seen again. This is from 1972's FURTHER ADVENTURES OF THOSE FABULOUS FURRY FREAK BROTHERS by none other than Gilbert Shelton. This poster was available for a mere $2.25 and it graced many an apartment wall in the 1970s.Possibly this would make a good bumper sticker today. Rather than all those "I'd rather be fishing" or "A bad day's golf is better than a good day at work."

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