informationgeek: (Default)
[personal profile] informationgeek

"Absolutely, Wonder Woman is a feminist icon. Throughout the course of her history, she has been a role model of strength and empowerment for young women, and today, those young women of the '60s and '70s are doctors and lawyers and executives for some of the world's biggest corporations. But I think that more importantly, Wonder Woman is a humanist and I would say that today, she is simply a symbol of equality and empowerment." - Meredith Finch

Writer: Meredith Finch
Artist: David Finch
Inkers: Batt, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, and Sonia Oback
Colorist: Sonia Oback

Warning for violence.

Read More... )
informationgeek: (djpon3)
[personal profile] informationgeek

"The central conflict of our story is an internal one. When I think about what Diana/Wonder Woman represents… the word that comes to mind is love. Everything she does is based around the intense love she has for humanity. How will she reconcile that now that she is the God of War?" - Meredith Finch

Writer: Meredith Finch
Artist: David Finch
Inkers: Batt, Danny Miki, and Sonia Oback
Colorist: Sonia Oback

Read More... )
informationgeek: (djpon3)
[personal profile] informationgeek

"One of the things I was really drawn to about her is, she has such integrity and that she really is the balance in-between. Batman is that really gritty, dark hero, Superman is really -- I don't want to say almost god-like, but he's really pure. She sort of combines the best of both of them and she has a lot of character. I think the thing that drew her to me the most was her integrity and the courage of her convictions. She may not always be right, but she's going to follow through and do what she believes in, whether anyone else believes in it or not. I really love that she's willing to take a flying leap and then deal with the consequences later." - Meredith Finch

Writer: Meredith Finch
Artist: David Finch
Inker: Richard Friend
Colorist: Sonia Oback

You know... I'm surprised no one has done a post on this yet. Some of the later issues sure, but the first few issues of the Finches run on Wonder Woman? Nothing. As such, let's change that and spotlight their first issue.

Read More... )
[personal profile] lego_joker
Yes, I know it's been ages since World of Wondy was ever a thing, but to tell you all the truth, it was one of my favorite attractions on this site, and what eventually convinced me to give Perez's Wonder Woman run a second go-round after I gave up somewhere in the middle of Challenge of the Gods.

Having now read up to the first annual (according to some, the best Perez's run is ever going to get), my general thoughts are still kinda on the ehhh side. I know that this run was a godsend compared to what poor Diana had to deal with for the forty or so years after Marston's death, and Perez brought an endless fountain of Legitimately Cool Ideas to the table, but the execution struck me as ridiculously stuffy and dry compared to what Byrne's Superman and Miller's Batman were up to back then.

Until I hit issue #20. At which point I started bawling like a baby.

Okay, so I might be in something of a minority when I saw that I unabashedly love Myndi Mayer. The half-dozen people on the Internet who still remember she of the giant forehead generally have opinions ranging from apathy to outright dislike, which was probably Perez's intent from the start, but all I saw was the funnest member of the cast. She was kind of an asshole, yeah, but rarely (if ever) an asshole about being an asshole. And in a setting where all the other good guys are Mature, Responsible (And Very, Very Boring) Adults, that goes a long way toward making an impression.

And for the record - I knew her days were numbered long beforehand. Browsing covers on Comicvine will do that to ya, and Perez was not in the general vicinity of fucking around when he drew this one.

Cover for Wonder Woman #20 (1988)

I knew she was going to die. I even knew how she was going to die. And reading that issue was still like a kick to the teeth.

So here's something of a tribute to this most underrated part of Wondy's supporting cast, that you all might understand why I loved her so much. Or point and laugh. Either one.

Warning: blood, drugs, and lots of 80s-tastic fashions. )
superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime

"The fun is in taking that iteration of those characters out of that timeframe having them interact in a darker and more modern story structure." - Larry Hama

Read more... )
icon_uk: (Default)
[personal profile] icon_uk
Following "Batman '66", DC's next Digital First title, is the Lynda Carter inspired "Wonder Woman '77"

Now it has to be said that, though Batman 66 set it's own surreal tone, Wonder Woman 77 was more of a product of the late 1970's... Disco... a certain post Bicentennial afterglow of patriotic fervour and the pesky, pesky Russians....

So what could be more natural... )
ozaline: (Default)
[personal profile] ozaline
I'm a little more generous to the New-52 than some other fans, there are a lot of books I've enjoyed, including Wonder Woman, but one thing I have not been able to forgive is making Diana the daughter of Zeus. Of course Azzarello and Jim Lee had their reasons for doing so, as stated in this article:

“She’s going to learn she’s not who she was told she was,” Azzarello told the Post. “Everybody’s got a father, even if he’s not the nicest guy in the world.”

DC Co-Publisher Jim Lee told the Post that rewriting the character’s origins to make her the offspring of two parents rather than, say, sand could make Wonder Woman accessible to many readers. “In this case, making her a god actually makes her more human, more relatable,” said Lee.

I reject that reasoning... first off I question why in a universe where there are a number of last of their kind aliens, demons, and immortals we read about that a woman forged from clay is such a stretch. The two largest religions in the world share a creation story where a man was formed from dust, and his wife from his rib.

Never mind the "everyone has got a father," thing while true from a biological perspective (depending on how you define father), does not necessarily play into the life of every person raised by a same-sex couple, or single parent.

And most importantly, it undermines a parallel to Greek Myth and the origin of Pandora in Hessiod's Works and Days. More on that

behind the cut )
icon_uk: (Default)
[personal profile] icon_uk
News from NYCC

Since Batman 66 has been doing quite well, it seems only natural that for their next title, DC Digital are producing one based on TV's live-action Wonder Woman!

And the first cover art from Nicola Scott is a thing of genuine beauty!

She's a wonder, Wonder Woman! )


scans_daily: (Default)
Scans Daily
Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

Bottom line: If slash, feminism or anti-oppressive practice makes you react negatively, [community profile] scans_daily is probably not for you.

Please read the community ethos and rules before posting or commenting.

December 2015

   1 2345

Most Popular Tags


RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags