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[personal profile] informationgeek
wonderwomanrebirth01cover

"I've read everything [in "Wonder Woman"] since I left, so the goal of this is not to be "This is a continuation of Greg's run." The goal is that this is a continuation of Wonder Woman's story. Since it's cast in the light of "Rebirth," one of the things we're all working really hard at doing is reconciling some of the incredible inconsistencies that have arisen in the 75-year history of the character." - Greg Rucka

Writer: Greg Rucka
Artists: Matthew Clark & Liam Sharp
Inker: Sean Parsons
Colorists: Jeremy Colwell & Laura Martin

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


'I always felt one of the fundamentals of Wonder Woman in at least the last two decades is that she always seems to be on trial, and I don't mean that in a story sense. Everyone's always saying, "Why does nobody buy Wonder Woman? Why isn't she any good?" It seems like she's always on trial, so I thought if I literalized that and made the story basically the Amazons bringing her back home after her first adventure away and putting her on trial, it'd be different from anything else you might see. The Amazons have their own ways of doing things. It's kind of asking Wonder Woman to justify herself, which I feel has almost been what the character's had to do for a long time.' -- Grant Morrison

I'm dividing this into three parts because there are so many pages. Here's part 3.

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[personal profile] laughing_tree
'For the first 48 pages, there are no men — it’s just women talking to each other. And then halfway through the book, we’re building up to this big fight, and then I thought, “No, I’m not.” This book isn’t about fights, there’s not going to be any fights. So we threw out the rules of traditional boy’s adventure fiction. It’s the most exciting book I’ve done in years, it changed everything I’m thinking about the future.' -- Grant Morrison

I'm dividing this into three parts because there are so many pages. Here's part 2.

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


'I sat down and I thought, “I don’t want to do this warrior woman thing.” I can understand why they’re doing it, I get all that, but that’s not what William Marston wanted, that’s not what he wanted at all! His original concept for Wonder Woman was an answer to comics that he thought were filled with images of blood-curdling masculinity, and you see the latest shots of Gal Gadot in the costume, and it’s all sword and shield and her snarling at the camera. Marston’s Diana was a doctor, a healer, a scientist. So I went back to those roots and just built it up again.' -- Grant Morrison

I'm dividing this up between three posts, since there are so many pages. Here's part 1.

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[personal profile] zapbiffpow
I wasn't very familiar with Etta Candy going into this issue, but based on just this, I like her so far. Here's how Diana and Etta first met, plus Diana's Xena + Samurai Jack + Quantum Leap origin. (At least for this arc. I think.)


Also, look at that sickass cover! That'd make an excellent character poster.

Writer & Artist: Renae De Liz
6 pages from a nice 20 page issue.

Hardwick, Sugar and, uh ... Araminta. Dammit. Whatever other family names. )
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[personal profile] informationgeek
wonderwoman42cover

"We did bring Superman into our last arc, but I really felt like for this arc, I wanted to focus not on that relationship, because there is the book for that relationship, and instead focus on the other women in her life. So you’re really going to see her relationship with Donna, and how that’s evolving. And—I wanted to develop more friendships for her. So we’re gonna see some more of that dynamic with Hessia and Zola and Hera. Because one of the biggest things for women, I find for myself, and I’m sure most women can relate to this, is your support group, and your support family." - Meredith Finch

Writer: Meredith Finch
Artist: David Finch
Inkers: Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, and Sonia Oback
Colorist: Sonia Oback


Warning for violence.

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[personal profile] informationgeek
wonderwoman40cover

"Absolutely, Wonder Woman is a feminist icon. Throughout the course of her history, she has been a role model of strength and empowerment for young women, and today, those young women of the '60s and '70s are doctors and lawyers and executives for some of the world's biggest corporations. But I think that more importantly, Wonder Woman is a humanist and I would say that today, she is simply a symbol of equality and empowerment." - Meredith Finch

Writer: Meredith Finch
Artist: David Finch
Inkers: Batt, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, and Sonia Oback
Colorist: Sonia Oback


Warning for violence.

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[personal profile] informationgeek
wonderwoman38cover

"The central conflict of our story is an internal one. When I think about what Diana/Wonder Woman represents… the word that comes to mind is love. Everything she does is based around the intense love she has for humanity. How will she reconcile that now that she is the God of War?" - Meredith Finch

Writer: Meredith Finch
Artist: David Finch
Inkers: Batt, Danny Miki, and Sonia Oback
Colorist: Sonia Oback


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[personal profile] informationgeek
wonderwoman36cover

"One of the things I was really drawn to about her is, she has such integrity and that she really is the balance in-between. Batman is that really gritty, dark hero, Superman is really -- I don't want to say almost god-like, but he's really pure. She sort of combines the best of both of them and she has a lot of character. I think the thing that drew her to me the most was her integrity and the courage of her convictions. She may not always be right, but she's going to follow through and do what she believes in, whether anyone else believes in it or not. I really love that she's willing to take a flying leap and then deal with the consequences later." - Meredith Finch

Writer: Meredith Finch
Artist: David Finch
Inker: Richard Friend
Colorist: Sonia Oback


You know... I'm surprised no one has done a post on this yet. Some of the later issues sure, but the first few issues of the Finches run on Wonder Woman? Nothing. As such, let's change that and spotlight their first issue.

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[personal profile] lego_joker
Yes, I know it's been ages since World of Wondy was ever a thing, but to tell you all the truth, it was one of my favorite attractions on this site, and what eventually convinced me to give Perez's Wonder Woman run a second go-round after I gave up somewhere in the middle of Challenge of the Gods.

Having now read up to the first annual (according to some, the best Perez's run is ever going to get), my general thoughts are still kinda on the ehhh side. I know that this run was a godsend compared to what poor Diana had to deal with for the forty or so years after Marston's death, and Perez brought an endless fountain of Legitimately Cool Ideas to the table, but the execution struck me as ridiculously stuffy and dry compared to what Byrne's Superman and Miller's Batman were up to back then.

Until I hit issue #20. At which point I started bawling like a baby.

Okay, so I might be in something of a minority when I saw that I unabashedly love Myndi Mayer. The half-dozen people on the Internet who still remember she of the giant forehead generally have opinions ranging from apathy to outright dislike, which was probably Perez's intent from the start, but all I saw was the funnest member of the cast. She was kind of an asshole, yeah, but rarely (if ever) an asshole about being an asshole. And in a setting where all the other good guys are Mature, Responsible (And Very, Very Boring) Adults, that goes a long way toward making an impression.

And for the record - I knew her days were numbered long beforehand. Browsing covers on Comicvine will do that to ya, and Perez was not in the general vicinity of fucking around when he drew this one.

Cover for Wonder Woman #20 (1988)

I knew she was going to die. I even knew how she was going to die. And reading that issue was still like a kick to the teeth.

So here's something of a tribute to this most underrated part of Wondy's supporting cast, that you all might understand why I loved her so much. Or point and laugh. Either one.

Warning: blood, drugs, and lots of 80s-tastic fashions. )

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