skemono: I read dead racists (Default)
[personal profile] skemono
So I started reading Cyborg 009 recently, and the introduction of one of the characters who would become a cyborg seemed... familiar.

*snaps fingers* )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In my previous post, [personal profile] sindra pointed out that the victim's retribution on the protagonist was disproportionate, in that he claimed he merely wanted to teach him a lesson, via a "Hollywood Voodoo" (i.e., not real-life Voudon) spell, but in fact ended up killing him via reverse ageing. Instead, sindra argued, the protagonist should've been punished in a way that would spare his life and allow him to mend his ways.

My initial response was "Then it wouldn't be a horror story!" But then I remembered "A Spell of Misery!" from the obscure Charlton comic, Creepy Things (#2, Oct 1975), in which a villainous protagonist also finds himself on the receiving end of a "Hollywood Voodoo" spell, but gets a second chance to make amends. (Script: Joe Gill, art: Rich Larson.) The story even has a socially-relevant topic: the deplorable living conditions in inner-city slums. Unfortunately, like many a well-meaning "social relevance" story from the Bronze Age of comics, it contains flagrant racial stereotypes. Consider this a trigger warning.

Don't mess with Mama Carafino )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Time for another cracktastic Fantomah: Mystery Woman of the Jungle adventure by Fletcher Hanks (as Barclay Flagg). This story is from Jungle Comics #6 (Fiction House, June 1940), which is in the public domain (scans courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com).

Trigger warning for the racist depiction of African indigenous people.

Just Say No to drug berries of the Unexplored Red Region, kids! )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




These scans are from a one-shot propaganda comic. Created in 1947 by an uncredited writer and artist, and issued by the Catechetical Guild Education Society, a Roman Catholic publisher, Is This Tomorrow envisions, step by step, how a communist takeover of America might take place. While the scenario isn't entirely implausible (we're not talking anywhere near Chick Tract-level distortion of reality, here), it does call for more than a little suspension of disbelief in places. And snark. Let's not forget the snark.

This 48-page comic is now in the public domain (scans courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com).

It Can Happen Here(?) Also, trigger warning for racism and violence/gore )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




There's pretty much nothing I can say, to summarize this work's artistic and commercial impact on sequential art, that others haven't said before, so on to the scans, all from Maus II: And Here My Troubles Began (Pantheon, 1991). Total of nine pages out of 130: two from Chapter 1, one from Chapter 2, six (out of 24 pages) from Chapter 3.

Trigger warning for scenes of Holocaust atrocities and for racist speech.

Read more... )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Sorry, Mistah J, but as far as grim, unlucky origin stories go, I think this villain may have you beat. From the disturbed imagination of Golden Age cult favourite Fletcher Hanks (as Barclay Flagg), this is the story of Zomax, featuring Fantomah, Mystery Woman of the Jungle. It's from Jungle Comics #14 (Fiction House, February 1941), which is in the public domain (scans courtesy of Comic Book Plus).

Read more; trigger warning for one-panel racist depiction )
espanolbot: (Default)
[personal profile] espanolbot
When writing about a subject that interests him, you can tell a marked difference in the style of Garth Ennis' comics. Less toilet humour and shocking things for the sake of being shocking, for example. As such a lot of his books based on military history tend to be a lot less "Ennis" than, say, his superhero work.
Trigger warning for rape and racism )

Uber #6

Oct. 29th, 2013 11:11 pm
superboyprime: (Default)
[personal profile] superboyprime
With this issue, the series shifts focus to the Pacific Theater...



Trigger warning: Racial slurs towards the Japanese.

Read more... )

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