thehefner: (Two-Face: FOREVER!!!)
[personal profile] thehefner
This is a big one. Grab a snack.

I've been putting off reviewing Batman: Face the Face for five years now. Every time I started, my criticisms melted down into curses and incoherent ranting, until my computer screen became obscured by rabid spittle. Okay, it wasn't THAT bad, but still.

In some ways, it's actually an ideal introductory trade paperback to get into Batman. Like Hush, it's a murder mystery that also serves as a tour of Gotham's inhabitants, and it was immediately followed by Grant Morrison and Paul Dini's runs. Unfortunately, it's also deeply frustrating, especially if you're a fan of Harvey Dent.

This was the first story to use the character in the three years since Hush, since Loeb supposedly had plans for Harvey hich kept him in limbo until those plans would reach fruition. They never did, and I think folks at DC wanted their precious status quo back in place. I also understand that Two-Face is Dan DiDio's favorite villain, which may have been a factor. In any case, Face the Face is one of the most significant Two-Face stories in canon, and also one of the most painfully frustrating. After five years, I finally have the words to explain just why.





The lost year of Gotham's Unknown Protector, Harvey Dent )




Batman: Face the Face can be purchased here if you wish to read the story in full, including the Tim Drake subplot, several other Rogues doing their Rogue things, and the entire issue dedicated to Harvey and Two-Face's discussion. As mentioned above, it also serves as a gateway to the comics which are coming out today, leading directly to Dini's Detective Comics and Morrison's Batman.
[identity profile] foxhack.insanejournal.com
[insanejournal.com profile] xdoop posted some scans from Batman: Streets of Gotham's Manhunter stories a few hours ago. They featured Jane Doe, who was... quite different from the last time I'd seen her in comics. The first time I'd seen her was in Arkham Asylum: Living Hell, where she was one of the three or four parallel stories featured in the six issue miniseries. This post contains a summary and several spoilers for the book.

All books were written by Dan Slott, illustrated by Ryan Sook, and colored by Lee Loughridge. The artwork has a very Hellboy, Mike Mignola vibe to it which works well in this context.

Photobucket

[identity profile] seawolf10.insanejournal.com
In keeping with the theme of reposting high-quality comics from the old s_d...

I'm not terribly fond of Dan Slott, but I consider his "Arkham Asylum: Living Hell" miniseries to be a must-read for any Batman fan. It ranges from darkly humorous to outright horrifying -- sometimes both at once.

Lunchtime at Arkham: One of the few places on Earth that can make you nostalgic for your high school cafeteria. )

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