cyberghostface: (Doom)
[personal profile] cyberghostface


"I think if you asked any citizen on the streets of Latveria who their favorite hero is, they'll tell you it's Doom. And it's not because someone is holding a gun to their head. He is very much the people's hero and their beloved leader. He doesn't need to use any propaganda." -- Dan Slott

Scans under the cut... )
cyberghostface: (Doom)
[personal profile] cyberghostface


"Victor von Doom is one of my favorite characters. I actually like him more than the FF! [laughs] He's one of the all-time great -- I'm not going to say villain -- adversaries. Over in Infamous, Brian showed Doom trying his best to be a hero. Then Brian was incredibly cruel to him at the end. So, we're picking up the pieces from there. And in FF #1 we showed that, in his own way, Doom is still heroic. He's just a hero for his people in Latveria. So, his heart will be in the right place and he's still going to try to be heroic by his own rules." -- Dan Slott

Scans under the cut... )
informationgeek: (Octavia)
[personal profile] informationgeek
civilwar7cover

When it comes to the actual battles that the characters in “Civil War” will be fighting, readers shouldn’t expect the anti-registration side to just be reactive in fighting for their cause. “They will be a combination of both reactive and proactive,” Millar explained. “I didn’t want to just have these guys in, say, like a terrorist cell or anything because fundamentally Cap’s guys are superheroes. So, the rationale for the Marvel Universe shouldn’t be that they’re just underground guys who are constantly fighting the forces of the status quo. They’ve got to be superheroes. They’ve got to go out and actually fight super villains and, unfortunately, SHIELD and the other superheroes are after them when they’re doing so. It’s an added tension to the whole thing.”

“Civil War” is a conflict between the heroes of the Marvel Universe, but the villains do a play a role in the series. Millar is keeping their part in the story a secret, but he did reveal that he would be touching on an idea from his “Marvel Knights Spider-Man” run in which a secret cabal of industrialists conspired to create many of the costumed villains in the Marvel Universe. “There’s some stuff going on with the villains about half way through the book, but really the main focus of the series is the split between the heroes and the other stuff is just really seasoning.”

The split between the heroes is over the superhuman registration act, which mandates that anyone who puts on a costume and goes out to try and enforce the law must register with and become an agent of the federal government. Heroes who violate the law will find themselves imprisoned in newly redesigned secretive superhuman penitentiaries. “That’s actually quite a big plot point,” Millar stated. “There’s a whole new way of storing super villains and heroes who refuse to sign. It’s quite a big deal. We’re really updating the Marvel Universe in a lot of ways.”

“Civil War” will also address how countries around the world view the US government’s new policy on super humans. Some of the fictional Marvel countries that don’t exactly see eye to eye with the US, like Wakanda, Latveria, Atlantis, and Providence, might even become embroiled in the events of the story. “Some will be involved quite a bit and others will remain neutral and others might come in at a later stage,” Millar explained. “That’s part of the meat of the story really.”

The various countries of the Marvel Universe will have different degrees of participation in “Civil War,” but the globe spanning organization SHIELD will play a definite part in the mega-story. “SHIELD’s new boss Maria Hill isn’t quite as cozy with the superheroes as Nick Fury was,” Millar stated. “So, that works very well within the scenario. It would have been a lot harder to do this if Nick, who is very pro-superhero, was in charge because he would have been probably against the registration act, whereas, Maria Hill made the story a whole lot easier for that.”
- from a Comic Book Resources Article

Story By: Mark Millar
Art By: Steve McNiven

Read More... )
cyberghostface: (Spider-Man)
[personal profile] cyberghostface


So here the title crossed a fairly big milestone, it's 100th issue. While USM was far from an 'underdog' it was something that many people wrote off as a gimmick from the getgo and the idea that it would get to a 50th issue, let alone twice that, was seen as laughable in 2001. Fortunately the title not only surpassed that but Bendis and Bagley would also later go on to break the record for longest uninterrupted run by two people on a Marvel title (previously held by Stan and Jack on Fantastic Four).

And what better way to celebrate such a momentous occasion but a take on one of the most maligned stories in Spider-Man history?

Scans under the cut... )
ozaline: (Default)
[personal profile] ozaline



Reed Richards is quite wrong... a soviet nuclear tech who had been exposed to a seriously unhealthy dose of radiation while trying to prevent the meltdown of Chernobyl, only to find saboteurs on hand, has been brought to Doctor Estivez, the best hematologist in America, for a bone marrow transplant. But when she unhooks the sedative flow in his containment suit, the Avengers are faced with a man who has gained superpowers from the treatments already given him by the Russians but who still thinks he's trying to save Chernobyl.. Those powers include controls over Nuclear forces... clearly this isn't a situation that calls for the talents of Mr. Fantastic, good thing he stayed home

So Rage could answer the call )
[personal profile] lego_joker
Okay, so... long story short, I, a lifelong DC fan, have spent the last several weeks trying to jump into Marvel. Partly for bragging rights, partly because I'm genuinely curious as to whether Marvel has told stories DC genuinely couldn't. I've tried several jumping-on points so far: the first couple issues of The Avengers, the issues of Daredevil leading up to the legendary Frank Miller run, and a couple of the earlier DC/Marvel crossover GNs. Each of them had their moments, but none were really things I'd willingly go back to.

Then a buddy suggested that maybe I should start where it all began: with Marvel's first family. Of course, he then immediately clarified that he meant a modern take on it - preferably by someone whose name begins with "H" and rhymes with "Rickman" - but by then I'd already went and gotten myself the first ten issues of the Lee/Kirby Fantastic Four. Having read through about six of them, I remain tentatively interested in seeing where the King and his faithful self-promoter sidekick is going with all this.

Wait, this was supposed to be a short story, wasn't it? Shit. Basically, I'm looking for suggestions - any suggestions - as to which parts of the MU I should try out next. In the meantime, have this activity I shamelessly ripped off film critic and all-around hilarious Internet reviewer Tim Callahan, in which I determine which page in each of the first four FF issues best sums up what I love about the issue as a whole.

Warning: opinions under cut may be more noob than they appear )

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