[personal profile] lego_joker
Yes, I know it's been ages since World of Wondy was ever a thing, but to tell you all the truth, it was one of my favorite attractions on this site, and what eventually convinced me to give Perez's Wonder Woman run a second go-round after I gave up somewhere in the middle of Challenge of the Gods.

Having now read up to the first annual (according to some, the best Perez's run is ever going to get), my general thoughts are still kinda on the ehhh side. I know that this run was a godsend compared to what poor Diana had to deal with for the forty or so years after Marston's death, and Perez brought an endless fountain of Legitimately Cool Ideas to the table, but the execution struck me as ridiculously stuffy and dry compared to what Byrne's Superman and Miller's Batman were up to back then.

Until I hit issue #20. At which point I started bawling like a baby.

Okay, so I might be in something of a minority when I saw that I unabashedly love Myndi Mayer. The half-dozen people on the Internet who still remember she of the giant forehead generally have opinions ranging from apathy to outright dislike, which was probably Perez's intent from the start, but all I saw was the funnest member of the cast. She was kind of an asshole, yeah, but rarely (if ever) an asshole about being an asshole. And in a setting where all the other good guys are Mature, Responsible (And Very, Very Boring) Adults, that goes a long way toward making an impression.

And for the record - I knew her days were numbered long beforehand. Browsing covers on Comicvine will do that to ya, and Perez was not in the general vicinity of fucking around when he drew this one.

Cover for Wonder Woman #20 (1988)

I knew she was going to die. I even knew how she was going to die. And reading that issue was still like a kick to the teeth.

So here's something of a tribute to this most underrated part of Wondy's supporting cast, that you all might understand why I loved her so much. Or point and laugh. Either one.

Warning: blood, drugs, and lots of 80s-tastic fashions. )
[identity profile] scottyquick.insanejournal.com
A really sweet little story by George Perez and Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez that I read the other day and thought y'all might like.


Collected, along with many other cool stories, in the pretty Wonder Woman: Destiny Calling.
[identity profile] bluefall.insanejournal.com
Back to the main Wondy title this time, where we've moved on from the Luke era into the Jimenez era. Generally, I'm not a big fan of Jimenez. He had the particular talent of being both spectacular and spectacularly bad within the space of a single panel, he was a slut for continuity porn to a point often detrimental to storytelling, and he expected his readers to be familiar with pre-Crisis Wondy and random Power Company bad guys and the Super Friends show and all kinds of random crap in order to make sense of half his secondary & tertiary characters. Also, he did a hack job on Polly and saddled us with the travesty that is Trevor Barnes.

However, he gave us some important storylines with some interesting ideas behind them, even when the execution wasn't totally on, and he does a reasonably good Cassie (although again, I don't really know how much of that is that he does a good Cassie and how much is that my standards for "good Cassie" have dropped significantly since YJ ended). So onward we go, with the sad tale of Circe, Diana, and Vanessa Kapatelis: Silver Swan II.





Next time: The JLA indulges in petty bickering, a funny-looking alien calls Diana a whore, Major Disaster takes his life in his hands, and Manitou coins my favorite Wondy nickname of all time.
[identity profile] ebailey140.insanejournal.com
Some highlights from one of my favorite JLU episodes, "Kid Stuff", in which Diana, Clark, Bruce, John... and Etrigan are tranformed into children, with Dakota Fanning voicing Diana.




And, the last three pages of Wonder Woman V2 #62, which ended the Perez run. The War of the Gods is over, though not everyone survived. Perez's final issue was about the characters closing chapters of their lives and beginning new ones, including the Amazons, Steve, Etta, and Ed, with Diana trying to figure out what she should do, next. Nessie, meanwhile, is graduating Junior High, and we conclude with a little meta and Fourth Wall breaking.

Read more... )
[identity profile] ebailey140.insanejournal.com
Dr. Psycho was introduced in the Golden Age, and quickly became one of Wonder Woman's main foes. When George Perez revamped WW following Crisis of Infinite Earths, it was natural that he'd bring back, and revamp, Dr. Psycho, as he'd done with the Cheetah, Ares, the Silver Swan, and Circe.

Perez didn't rush into it, though. Dr. Psycho was re-introduced towards the end of Perez's run. But, as this was, really, a five year epic story, Dr. Psycho entered the stage when it was time for him to play his role.

And, that role would be nightmarish. Literally. This would establish him as one of the most twisted and evil of DC's villains. But, what's truly important is how Diana responds, how she deals with this threat. It's often said that heroes are, in part, defined by their villains. The villain represents what the hero must overcome in their struggles, what makes them heroes. Also, Diana, as she often does during Perez's run, demonstrates that she has other ways of dealing with evil than simply beating it up.



Read more... )
[identity profile] bluefall.insanejournal.com
From as far back as Marston, Wonder Woman's defining short phrase, her version of "Caped Crusader" or "Man of Steel" or "Scarlet Speedster," has been "Amazon Princess." Which is fair, because that's what she is in the most literal sense - the daughter of the amazon queen (well at least until they dissolved the monarchy, but at this point I think I'm going to have to admit I've lost that one) - but for most of her pre-Crisis history, was nevertheless a relatively empty phrase. Diana was a princess because girls like princesses, as any Disney exec can tell you, and that was it. Occasionally the authority was useful, but basically it was a purely meta thing that was merely convenient shorthand for her specialness.

Part of Perez' genius was to actually consider what being a princess means for Diana, especially from the mythical perspective of this very mythical character. Mythic royalty isn't about tiaras and castles, after all. It's about stewardship, struggle, king sacrifice; about servitude and symbiosis and taking your people's burdens for your own. Diana, as Athena's champion and essentially a demigod, is an avatar of the Olympians, yes - but as heir to the throne, she's also the avatar of the amazons, and that responsibility is as integral to her character as her duty to her gods. She bleeds when her people bleed, they win when she wins, their story is hers and hers theirs. And Perez' run was saturated with that understanding, in a constant intertwining of Diana's mission and the activities of the Amazon Nation as a whole. She's not just one of them, she's not even just the best of them; she is them, full stop. That concept underpins the particular awesomeness I've got on offer today - this is the story of Themyscira and how the Amazon Nation reconnected with Man's World. Because Diana did, and so that Diana could. And because it's a damn good story.

Also, Diana v. Lois action. You know you want to see that.



Man do I love that cover. )

Next time: Perez attempts to pre-empt strawfeminist portrayals of the Themyscirans with some strawfeminists of his own for Diana to oppose. And because he is Perez, they end up completely fascinating anyway.
[identity profile] bluefall.insanejournal.com
This next is not actually a story about Diana herself, but rather a story about the people around her and the world she lives in. That's not uncommon in a general sense, but it's actually relatively rare with Diana - you just don't get stories about Themyscira or a day in the life of Philippus the way you get stories about Gotham or the investigative exploits of Lois Lane. So this, the story of tertiary cast member Lucy Spears, is a bit of a rare gem in that sense.

It's also a rare gem in many other senses, as you'll see once you click the cut.



This was originally a Manly Tears Week entry. Just a warning. )

Next time: More trouble from the spawn of Ares, and men walk on Themysciran shores, which isn't the catastrophe it would have been pre-Crisis but still manages to spell more trouble than it initially seems worth.
[identity profile] bluefall.insanejournal.com
Alright, both by request and because I myself feel something at a loss with it gone, here commences the repost of my When Wondy was Awesome series from our LJ incarnation.

We'll begin, as is proper, at the beginning - the origin of the character as she is now. The concept of Wonder Woman, of course, is one of the oldest in Big Two comics, as she was first created by Marston back in 1941. However, once the Golden Age ended and the character passed into other hands, she became something of an albatross to the company - they were under contract to keep publishing her, but they didn't really know what to do with her, and her title quickly devolved into a miserable sexist mess from which it never entirely recovered.

Thus, with Crisis on Infinite Earths, Editorial completely erased Wonder Woman from past continuity, deciding she would enter the DCU for the first time in the late 80s - allowing them to start over and try to really do her justice. After a long (and terrifying to read about for fear of what might have been) process, they finally found a team that they thought could both create a new and viable character, and preserve the essence of the one who came before; thus Diana passed into the hands of Greg Potter and the now-definitive George Perez.



And hot damn was that a good call. )

Next time: The nonsensical American flag bathing suit is made to make some small sliver of sense, we learn what kind of person inspires an amazon and why we should care about Steve Trevor, and Diana kills a hecatoncheries, as we tackle the second, less prominent but no less awesome half of Wonder Woman's origin.

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