alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



Although published in the early '70s, this "not meant to be ha-ha funny" piece (of the kind Mad has done on occasion) is unfortunately all too relevant today.

Warning, obviously, for bigotry of various kinds, including but not limited to racism, sexism/misogyny and anti-Semitism.

There's even a tie-in of sorts to the U.S. Election Day )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



"After [the Arcane Apocalypse story] I'd like to pick up on Liz and Dennis for a very down-to-earth non-supernatural horror story about just what Dennis has done with Liz in his efforts to keep her as his property and one true love. I've got an utterly sickening true story that I can use as a basis for this, something that happened to a remote relative of mine, and which I heard about through my favourite aunt who had picked up the pieces afterwards."

So wrote Alan Moore to Stephen Bissette in August 1983. For whatever reason, that story didn't, of course, immediately follow the "Arcane possesses Matt" arc. Moore revisited it when, according to Bissette, he found himself with writer's block after completing two extra-sized Swamp Thing issues just a few months apart, in addition to his other commitments. What resulted is, despite the disturbing subject matter, one of my favourite issues from his run on the title.

Warning for domestic abuse and misogyny.

'I guess it doesn't take much to dismantle a human being. We come apart so easily.' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



"I wanted to suggest that the real curse isn't menstruation but rather men's attitude toward it, and by extension their attitude to women as a whole. I wanted to get across, without being heavy handed, that it is the way in which men see and treat women that can often crush and trample women's minds and personalities into such tortured and self-destructive shapes."
--Alan Moore, Letters page, Swamp Thing #46

"The Curse" was Moore's most controversial Swamp Thing story, in terms of both industry and reader reaction.

Warning for misogyny/sexism, body shaming, and suicide.

'Their anger, in darkness turning, unreleased, unspoken...' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



"I was talking earlier — about anarchy and fascism being the two poles of politics. On one hand you’ve got fascism, with the bound bundle of twigs, the idea that in unity and uniformity there is strength; on the other you have anarchy [...] where the individual determines his or her own life. Now if you move that into the spiritual domain, then in religion, I find very much the spiritual equivalent of fascism. The word "religion" comes from the root word ligare [...] and basically means "bound together in one belief." It’s basically the same as the idea behind fascism; there’s not even necessarily a spiritual component it. Everything from the Republican Party to the Girl Guides could be seen as a religion, in that they are bound together in one belief. So to me, like I said, religion becomes very much the spiritual equivalent of fascism. And by the same token, magic becomes the spiritual equivalent of anarchy, in that it is purely about self-determination, with the magician simply a human being writ large, and in more dramatic terms, standing at the center of his or her own universe. Which I think is a kind of a spiritual statement of the basic anarchist position."
-- Alan Moore, in Margaret Killjoy, Mythmakers & Lawbreakers (2009).

Warning for misogynistic slurs and child abuse.

'The flames of freedom. How lovely. How just.' )
glaurung: (Default)
[personal profile] glaurung
Once upon a time, DC comics understood that comics don't have to be always serious grimdark heavy drama involving lots of gratuitous violence and rape. That was a good thing, but the less serious comics that DC put out weren't always worthwhile. Today it seemed appropriate to post 8/23 pages from issue 117 of the mercifully forgotten "The Adventures of Jerry Lewis" comic, an issue worthy of note today only because it guest starred Wonder Woman in her "mod" phase.

JerryLewis_117_00

gratuitous sexism and unfunny jokes ahoy )

The past was a different country, one in which it was possible for there to be over 100 issues of a Jerry Lewis comic.

ETA: the last page includes a statement of management and circulation. in 1970, "The Adventures of Jerry Lewis" was selling 175,000 copies every month. Do you think maybe, just maybe, going after ever more grimdark crossover events might have been a mistake on DC's part?

Giving this the crack tag, I guess? And the misogyny tag, because Jerry Lewis.
mastermahan: (Default)
[personal profile] mastermahan


Since Foolkiller ended with the implication Frank Castle was about to shoot The Hood, and the general consensus was "good riddance", I thought I'd take us all back to a time before Parker Robbins was a lame magic Kingpin wannabe, with the MAX series that first introduced him, written by a pre-Runaways and Y: The Last Man Brian K. Vaughn and drawn by Kyle Hotz.

Trigger warning for racism and sexist language.Read more... )
lordultimus: (Default)
[personal profile] lordultimus


The world was ending.

With the heroes gone, there was no one willing to stand against the coming darkness.

Except us.

We were sidekicks -- adopted, appointed, or recruited; nephews, daughters, cousins.

Children.

We weren't ready.

And the world wasn't ready to trust us with the power we had.


Read more... )

User #3

Jan. 19th, 2017 02:42 pm
mastermahan: (Default)
[personal profile] mastermahan


“For me, the issue has never been sexuality — crushes and lust and love come easily enough, and I’ve never cared what anyone else thought of my choices whether they were critical of the personality or gender of my chosen partner — it’s moving through the world with a particular set of gender expectations applied to me that’s always made me uncomfortable,” Grayson said. “It’s not that I’m a tomboy — I have a lot of very traditionally feminine traits and behaviors, but I also have several that are classically ascribed to males, and finding a way to make the world accept any kind of range or fluidity in your nature seems astonishingly difficult." -Devin Grayson

Trigger warning for sexual abuse and misogyny.

16 of 48 after the cut.Read more... )

User #2

Jan. 17th, 2017 08:55 pm
mastermahan: (Default)
[personal profile] mastermahan


“At some point in my teens, my dad walked in on me kissing a girl on the living room couch, and he called me downstairs for a ‘private discussion’ and seemed very upset, though I honestly had no idea why. He asked if we were ‘practicing,’ and I laughed and said something obnoxious like, ‘No, Dad, we’ve pretty much got it down,’ and I watched him just deflate. He had no idea what to say or do, and I think even realized that he wasn’t totally sure why he was mad. A few hours later he interrupted us again to yell at me about putting the cheese away wrong –not wrapping it up properly– and he was way more upset than one would need to be over refrigerator cheese etiquette, but eventually I learned how to wrap cheese up properly and he learned that it was just as uncomfortable for him when I kissed boys, so he might as well stay out of the whole thing." - Devin Grayson

Trigger warning for sexual abuse, misogyny, and homophobia.

16 of 48 pages after the cut.

Read more... )
informationgeek: (Octavia)
[personal profile] informationgeek
avengersdisassembled04cover

"I also hope that when people read ‘Avengers Finale,’ they’ll see the love and care, which’ll help them appreciate the story and they’ll see it was done with the utmost love and respect." - Brian Michael Bendis

All the destruction in “Disassembled” was a product of the Scarlet Witch’s resentment over the fact that she had lost her children (who never actually, really existed in the first place), and she blames the Avengers for this tragedy. Why? We’re never clearly told, though it’s indicated that she resents the Avengers for keeping the tragedy secret from her. But why, exactly, she now deems all these heroes—who she’s previously saved the world with, lived with, laughed with—worthy of death is really still a mystery. What we can see is an antiquated stereotype that a woman’s logic will always be undermined by her child-bearing nature. Here is the Scarlet Witch, a weathered warrior, a proven hero, yet she spins out of control because her innate animal instincts as a mother smother all reason. She’d rather destroy long-time friends than ask that they explain themselves. Evidently, her maternal needs outweigh all to which her life has been previously devoted—goodness, friendship, redemption, love. How does this make sense? Well, we are told by Doctor Strange that the Scarlet Witch never really had proper control over her magic and, as a result, her sanity has been slowly compromised by her unruly power. And, here, again, is two tired, misogynistic messages: that a woman can’t control herself and that a woman in a position of power always leads to disaster. You can find these themes in many pre-feminist writings, yet it was commonly thought that perhaps we had put these themes to rest, now that women hold top corporate, political, and other such powerful positions across the world. Yet, Marvel must be a few decades behind in feminist theory. More embarrassing, Marvel must also be a few decades behind in their own continuity, seeing as the Scarlet Witch has been learning and mastering her powers over the past 40 years. After all, readers actually watched her training, something rarely seen with other heroes. Yet, this woman is still out of control? What’s worse—she now needs to be de-powered, forced into her rightful place by a man, a sorcerer supreme. - The Problem of the Scarlet Witch: When Bad Girls Go Good, but Not for Good

Story By: Brian Michael Bendis
Art By: David Finch


WARNING for sexism and aggressive exposition dumping.

Read More... )
informationgeek: (lyra)
[personal profile] informationgeek
axeanarchy01cover

In 2012, AXE released Anarchy - the brand's first male/female paired fragrance. We knew that as soon as both genders had the AXE effect, chaos was inevitable. The only challenge was bringing this anarchy to life online for a demographic that's increasingly hard to engage. Our solution was to do more than just involve consumers - we decided to create the campaign with them. To do this, we embraced a genre that has fueled fantasies for decades and then reinvented it for a generation raised on the real-time web. Anarchy: The Graphic Novel was written by - and starring - its readers. - Press Release from Razorteeth

Writer: Scott Lobdell
Artist: Franchesco


Oh boy, have I uncovered something special today folks.



This was released to the public for free back in 2012 for all to read, enjoy, and download in PDF form. The site that hosted it no longer exists today though. So, it's lost to time except for what little I actually have.

Read More... )

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