icon_uk: (Default)
[personal profile] icon_uk
To start Monday morning off with some sort-of comic news, they've finally announced who will be voicing the Ray in the forthcoming "Crisis on Earth X" crossover event for the various DC TV series.

This is a little bigger than some news, since the Ray will be the first gay male hero that the DCTVU (There must be an easier name for it than that) has featured;

The Ray will debut in the crossover (which will also include Arrow, Supergirl, Flash and the Legends of Tomorrow team), before getting a four episode animated series "Freedom Fighters: The Ray", and will be played by openly gay British actor Russell Tovey, best known perhaps, aside from an appearance in Doctor Who as Midshipman Alonzo Fraim in "Voyage of the Damned" (And later making a brief cameo as a potential new boyfriend for Captain Jack in "The End of Time") as George, a werewolf in the supernatural comedy-drama "Being Human" (The UK version that is).

Some promotional art was put together by Phil Jimenez, in the style of the old multiple Earth crossover covers to publicise the event, which also hints that it will take place around the wedding (or not) of Barry Allen and Iris West.



(Click to embiggen)

Now, understandably, there has been some eyebrows raised at the decision, in the current political climate in the US, to make the Arrowverse/Supergirl crossover be based around Earth-X; the DC Earth where the Nazi's won World War II, and where we will see several Nazi versions of established heroes, so we'll have to see how THAT is handled (Secret Empire is a low bar to clear, but here's hoping)

As a geeky aside; Earth-X debuted in 1973, when WW was less than 30 years finished, as a separate home for a number of Quality Comics characters DC had acquired, like Uncle Sam, the Human Bomb, Doll Man, the Ray and Phantom Lady. They were folded into the WWII heroes following Crisis on Infinite Earths, though more modern takes on them have surfaced a time or two in the last couple of decades.


glaurung_quena: (supergirl flying)
[personal profile] glaurung_quena
In the beginning, Kara wore a blue frock:

Action-Comics-252-p00

If it looked a bit like a high school cheerleader's outfit (back in the day when cheerleader outfits didn't show much skin and weren't all that tight fitting), that was probably intentional. And this suited her just fine all through high school and most of the way though college. And then, 12 years later, her editors belatedly realized the 60's had brought a sea change in fashion, and things started to get weird. Sartorial madness ensued )

And that is the long and sad story of Kara's closet of super outfits. Maybe someone sensible came along and rescued her from further sartorial shame by stealing all but the hotpants ensemble?

In some cases sadly, in other cases thankfully, we never got to see her wearing some of the other outfits in that closet, but evidence of their existence was preserved:Read more... )
glaurung_quena: (supergirl flying)
[personal profile] glaurung_quena
Ah, 1970. The "Mod Squad" had been on the air for three years. Over in Britain, "Mod" styles were fading fast, but in offices of DC comics, where "hip" and "trendy" editors were always proud to be in the vanguard of all the latest cultural trends ("vanguard means in the rear, right?"), it was time for Supergirl to get slightly less behind the times, and a new "Mod" outfit was exactly the thing. Creator credits were still too radical for DC back then, but the Internet knows the blame is all on the head of writer/artist Mike Sekowsky.

adventure 397-00

5/15 pages) )

And that is the tale of how Supergirl hung up her cheerleader frock after, what, 12 years of wearing the exact same thing every day? Something tells me she would have changed things up a lot sooner if not for wanting to avoid a fight with her stick-in-the-mud cousin and his small town Kansas prudery.
glaurung_quena: (supergirl flying)
[personal profile] glaurung_quena
Set the wayback machine to Action Comics 273. Supergirl was still staying in the orphanage where Superman had put her, and still wearing the blue frock that looked like it had started life as a cheerleader costume. The sartorial madness of 70's era Supergirl was still a decade in the future. In the straitlaced world of 1961 comics, when a heroine needed a makeover, they didn't go to the tailor, their alter ego went to the hairdresser. And they did it by asking the readers to participate in a poll.

Action_Comics_273 poll

click to see the results, published about 8 months later )
ozaline: (Default)
[personal profile] ozaline
First off I'd like to draw your attention to this novel on Previews: https://previewsworld.com/Catalog/JUN172273

She will become one of the world's greatest heroes: Wonder Woman. But first she is Diana, Princess of the Amazons. And her fight is just beginning. Diana longs to prove herself to her legendary warrior sisters. But when the opportunity finally comes, she throws away her chance at glory and breaks Amazon law - risking exile - to save a mere mortal. Even worse, Alia Keralis is no ordinary girl and with this single brave act, Diana may have doomed the world. Alia is a Warbringer - a direct descendant of the infamous Helen of Troy, fated to bring about an age of bloodshed and misery. Together, Diana and Alia will face an army of enemies determined to either destroy or possess the Warbringer. If they have any hope of saving both their worlds, they will have to stand side by side against the tide of war.

That sounds like an interesting take Diana's origin with this Alia in place of Steve... I will read it!


This is also an interesting take on Wonder Woman's origin (Supergirl doing a comic for June Moone's art class in DC Superhero Girls: Out of the Bottle #2).

Read more... )
stubbleupdate: (Default)
[personal profile] stubbleupdate
Every other month, we have Mariko Tamaki day, where both Hulk and Supergirl: Being Super are released. That is my favourite new comics day. As a community, we've already covered in depth that Hulk is bloody good, but Being Super seems to have flown under the radar.

Another title for it could be Supergirl: Secret Identity*, or Supergirl: Girl of Steel. It's "retelling her origin for a new generation" but I'm not sure which continuity it fits into, if any. Each issue is a 48 page prestige issue and when it's all said and done, I'm buying the trade as well.

Before we get in to the story, know that it's bloody beautiful. Art is covered by Joelle Jones, who I adored when I first saw her in 2006's 12 Reasons Why I Love Her and followed her to Minx's Token. Since then she's done work at Marvel, DC, Dark Horse and her own series Lady Killer has taken off and Jones has become much, much better. There are jaw dropping, heart stopping splash pages in this book. But that's for another time.

Right now, I'm going to share a short flashback, as an aside from the main story. Being super )
Read more... )
*If you haven't read it, you are doing Superman wrong.
** But not rubbish. Actually, watching that trailer made me annoyed that we didn't get more of beardy Clark travelling the world, looking for his place in it.
zapbiffpow: (Default)
[personal profile] zapbiffpow


Here's another actually decent Diana moment! This time, it's about overcoming loss and the nature of grief, courtesy of the ragtag creative team behind DC Bombshells, whom should probably get a Sensation Comics monthly! (We do have Action and Detective, after all.)

Plus, Wonder Woman muses (weirdly) on the afterlife. Check it!

Words: Marguerite Bennett
Art: Matias Bergara
Colors: J. Nanjan
Letters: Wes Abbott


Fly Again )

mastermahan: (Default)
[personal profile] mastermahan


This is one of those covers that I've seen several times floating around the internet, and for good reason - it's Supergirl and Zatanna fighting over a yeti. It's one of those bizarre Bronze Age covers that does its job of making you wonder what the hell is going on. Did someone hit Supergirl and Zatanna with a love spell? Does the yeti himself have love powers? Do Kara and Zatanna both have a very specific fetish (no judgment)?

The answer, a more legible cover, and 7 pages of a 21 page story after the cut:Read more... )
espanolbot: (Default)
[personal profile] espanolbot
Ah, Supergirl, along with Batgirl one of DC's most recognised B-List superheroes. Also one who has undergone a fair bit of revision over the years, sharing that category of character with Hawkman and Donna Troy for overcomplicated, contradictory backstories. But, to simplify things, I'll focus on Supergirl Classic, the Kara Zor-El version.

Read more... )
rickperry: (pic#storm)
[personal profile] rickperry
Again, meet Cyborg Superman



Supergirl #2 was just released and we again once more see Cyborg Superman making an appearance as a villain.

Read more... )
rickperry: (pic#generations)
[personal profile] rickperry
Lex's Supergirl Obsession



Lex (pre-flashpoint) once dated Matrix Supergirl when he was posing as his son in a younger body. Mostly to get at Superman it seems in the long run. When that went sour it seemed he had a passionate hate for any female who decided to wear the S shield. Once Linda had retired as Supergirl and Cir-El was out of the picture, Kara landed on earth and became Supergirl.

Read more... )
ozaline: (Default)
[personal profile] ozaline
It begins with Supergirl and Streaky facing down a tornado that threatens Stanhope.

They find themselves transported a mysterious world where they have different powers.






The Mysterious Motr of Doov )
[personal profile] lego_joker
So guess what I found, everyone?

As much as today's comics are rightfully lambasted for their persistent sexist under(and sometimes over-)tones, it speaks rather glowingly of social progress that even the openly misogynist comics fans (and creators) of today would probably shudder at some of the works of yesteryear. As none of the comics on that list appear to be inhabitants of scans_daily (this edition, at least; some of them had probably been posted before the Great Crash), I have taken it upon myself to torture entertain you all with them.

First up... The Brave and the Bold #63 by one Mr. Bob Haney, creator of the Teen Titans, technical creator of Wonder Girl, and one of the most batshit insane writers of the Silver/Bronze age. I can't be certain, but I think this was the first meeting between Supergirl and Wonder Woman (this was before The Brave and the Bold turned into Batman and His Amazing Friends); if true, both "Super-chicks" have my deepest sympathies. Worse, the cover is an insidious little piece: 100% accurate to the story, 0% indicative of the shitstorm of sexism we're all in for.



Warning: do not read while drinking fluids. I will not be held reponsible for getting you a new keyboard. )

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