laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


One of many great moments from Late Night with David Letterman was a Howard Stern appearance where he was making OJ Simpson jokes and Dave wasn’t laughing. Stern called Dave out on it and Dave replied, “Well, double homicides don’t crack me up the way they used to.” Comedic, over-the-top violence doesn’t crack me up at all. I think it’s terrible. Violence is awful. Killing is terrible and has real consequences. This book is about those consequences. -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


As I see him, Deathstroke’s true super-power is his intellect. Marv and others have loaded him up with these other powers—virtually all of which I find to be unnecessary and tedious in the sense that I have to find ways to demonstrate them. I’d be much happier if Deathstroke simply was what I believe Marv intended him to be: the evil version of Batman. -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


I dislike the term “mercenary” as applied to Deathstroke and actively, repeatedly, try to discourage it. “Mercenary” was a term applied to Deathstroke once DC needed the character to function within the wider context of the DC heroes’ flow of traffic, so they broadened his description and started rounding the edges off. I’m trying to put those edges back. Deathstroke is a villain. A supervillain. Period. He is the world’s deadliest assassin, and he’s an asshole. -- Christopher Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


The common wisdom that Bruce Wayne is merely a daytime mask for Batman-- that Batman is Batman all of the time and only wears Wayne like a raincoat in order to serve Batman’s purpose--is reversed for Slade who is, in many ways, Batman's criminal counterpart. Slade Wilson really is Slade Wilson. “Deathstroke” is just a character he created to act more-or-less anonymously, although Deathstroke’s secret identity is hardly secret; it is, at best, selectively secret. -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


Now, if DC had a sense of humor at all, they would set up 1-800-Deathstroke, 1-800-Batman! Who’s your daddy? Whosyourdaddy.com! But no! I can’t tell you how it all shakes out, but they’re not making it as much fun as they could! Should be like, let’s raise money for charity, and you guys call in, and I bet you at the end of the day, I’d have the votes for Deathstroke! -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


Marie Javins, a DC editor, she invited me to write the book. My first thought was Marv Wolfman, and George Perez, where he carried labels like “anti-heroes,” “super soldier.” I don’t think of him in those terms. I think Deathstroke is a villain. Period. He is a bad guy who does bad things. He has his own warped code of ethics, but by and large he is just a villain. This is what I’m trying to drill down with the editors at DC. I don’t want to write stories where we create a bigger villain so he can seem heroic. Slade is not a good person, and that’s the core value that we’re trying to get back to. -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


He is not a mercenary, professional soldier, military subcontractor or any other clever euphemism used to round the edges off of his description. Deathstroke kills people for money. Lots of money. Slade is a family man, he is the patriarch of this deeply dysfunctional family, these people who will betray each other over a ham sandwich, so it kind of has a twisted appeal, sort of like The Sopranos with supervillains, so I thought this might be an interesting thing to do. -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


I’ve asked DC Comics to send a preview copy to Christianity Today. No word yet on if they’ve done so. But I’d really like comics to take more and greater chances and to expand our audience beyond the traditional market. There are *billions* of dollars– with a “B” –to be made in the evangelical market. It mystifies me as to why neither DC nor Marvel are in it.

I doubt any Christian bookstore would carry Deathstroke #20, mainly because it questions religion as much as embraces it. With traditional Christian bookstore chains, there’s a certain quantity of Kool Aid that must be consumed, which misses the mark of Christ’s message by about a mile.

Great art, great books and great music are typically banned from these chains which insist on a kind of inoffensive rounding off of reality and adherence to an evangelical message. In my experience, questioning my faith has only strengthened it.


-- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


Deathstroke, as I see him, and as Marv Wolfman and Geoff Johns wrote him, is a human being once removed from his humanity, in the same sense of a first cousin once-removed. There is a barrier between Slade Wilson and the human condition that Wilson is either afraid to traverse or barred from traversing. As powerful a man as he is, he simply cannot hug his children. And that’s basically what this entire storyline is about: the world, if not the universe, threatened with extinction because this man can’t hug his kids. -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"I have to admit a kind of reticence toward the trend I am seeing for female superheroines appearing to be… light and silly, like they’re engaging in cosplay or something. I very much dislike the Ravager’s mask on those grounds because the huge Spider-Man eyelets are too whimsical for this book. A lot of the super girls I am seeing are smiling and posing for the camera and don’t seem to be taking what they do very seriously. [...] I dunno, to me, it feels a little sexist. I mean, I’m happy women are reading comics, don’t get me wrong. But I want the gravity of Miller-era Elektra in Daredevil, and what I am seeing more or less echoes the CW version of Supergirl in different costumes and voices." -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"Post-Rebirth, the Deathstroke series becomes more introspective and character-driven. Slade (Deathstroke) Wilson and his adventures are toned down somewhat to be more in-keeping with the assassin’s core values: stealth, secrecy, invisibility, silence. This may grate some of the series’ current readers who have grown accustomed to Deathstroke leveling city blocks and battling space aliens and fiery demons, so I’m certainly more than nervous about how this new vision of the character—a kind of evil version of Batman—might be received." -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'Deathstroke #8 concludes “The Professional,” our first story arc, which was meant to not only re-establish Slade and his ersatz The Sopranos meets Married With Children supporting cast but to also explain, in a credible way, why a guy like Deathstroke continues to walk around the DC Universe. In other words, why isn’t every DCU hero working night and day to capture or kill this man? In my view, until we find a credible answer to that question, we have no book; we’re just kind of winging it and being untrue to either Deathstroke or the DCU heroes or both.' -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (LL)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'I am very much going my own way espec with Joseph who will be less of “the other” than has been traditionally portrayed. My take on Joseph is he’s a normal, happy, well-adjusted postgrad-age young adult not unlike Peter Parker. The only difference being Joseph cannot speak. Doesn’t–should not–make him a freak. I respectfully disagreed with the Joe As Psychopath direction and even, with all due respect, Marv [Wolfman]’s Joe As enigmatic Flower Child." -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'Therein lies DC’s challenge: to retain Deathstroke’s current fans while convincing new ones to sample a book they may not have traditionally supported. ABC tried and failed with SportsNight, mounting an entire ad campaign which virtually screamed, “IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT SPORTS!” PriestStroke, Slade The Deathstroke, is not about violence. It is about a man; an exploration of a lost humanity.' -- Christopher J. Priest

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


'This is a likely case of casting against type, which is why I said yes. If I were editing Deathstroke, I’m not sure I would have picked me, which then made me interested in taking a swing because it’s been a very, very long time since a publisher last selected me for a project based on my actual writing as opposed to my being, y’know, a Republican. I would never have pitched for Deathstroke (although I did write Conan for a long time–shameless plug for Dark Horse which has reprinted most of my run). But it occurred to me that somebody, somewhere, at DC actually gave this some thought– gave *me* some consideration past my ethnicity– which earned my respect for DC because I felt like this was an earnest creative decision more so than, “we need a Republican to write this.”' - Christopher James Priest

Read more... )

Profile

scans_daily: (Default)
Scans Daily

Extras

Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

Bottom line: If slash, feminism or anti-oppressive practice makes you react negatively, [community profile] scans_daily is probably not for you.

Please read the community ethos and rules before posting or commenting.

February 2019

S M T W T F S
      1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 1920212223
2425262728  

Most Popular Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags