alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



"One of the most talked-about Archie Comics stories ever [...] This one has taken on such legendary status that many don't even believe it exists."

--Paul Castiglia, Archie 75th Anniversary Digest #5



In 2012, One Million Moms protested against the marriage of Kevin and his boyfriend Clay in Life with Archie. I wonder what they would've made of this story, back when it was first published.

'I hope you like warm climates, Betty!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher
It's well known that Archie Comics was one of the leading publishers behind the implementation of the Comics Code Authority which kept comics squeaky-clean and decent for the tiny tots. But are you familiar with the expression "getting crap past the radar?"

Like, you, daddy-o! I learned it from watching you, dig? )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Yes, you read that right. In 1971, Archie Comics took a rare foray into current events and an even rarer stance on political issues with "Summer Prayer for Peace," which sees Archie, Jughead and Reggie inducted into the army, then debating the morality of draft dodging with a radical friend.

'Sing, sing of freedom / Sing a song of joy...' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In 1972, Archie Comics made its first major venture, since the MLJ days, into horror, with the series Chilling Adventures in Sorcery as Told by Sabrina. (This is not to be confused with the Chilling Adventures of Sabrina title launched earlier this very month in the wake of Afterlife with Archie's success.) Loosely patterned after the EC and other horror comics of the fifties, it was an anthology title hosted--for its first two issues--by everyone's favourite Teenage Witch, written and drawn by regulars from Archie's creative team: writer Frank Doyle and, in the stories excerpted here, Dan DeCarlo and Rudy Lapick on art.

If nothing else, this horror host is easier on the eyes than EC's GhouLunatics )
his_spiffynesss: (Default)
[personal profile] his_spiffynesss
Nedor comics, the company most famous for it's Golden Age superheroes Black Terror, Fighting Yank, and "Doc" Strange (no relation) stayed in business up until the mid 50's. By 1952 it was Archie comics that was the trend setter for the decade, and the company (then known as Standard) tried to cash in with their own teen comedy book. One clever twist they went with was setting it in the "far off future" of the 21st century, putting this comic a decade ahead of the Jetsons. The book was created by Dan DeCarlo, the artist whose character designs for Archie are still used to this day.

Photobucket
eight pages from a public domain comic )

Profile

scans_daily: (Default)
Scans Daily

Extras

Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

Bottom line: If slash, feminism or anti-oppressive practice makes you react negatively, [community profile] scans_daily is probably not for you.

Please read the community ethos and rules before posting or commenting.

September 2017

S M T W T F S
      1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24252627282930

Most Popular Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags