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[personal profile] laughing_tree


He’s died, he’s come back to life, he’s been the Spectre. He’s seen everything. So, I think one of the important things is that he’s not traumatized. Right now, there’s a vogue for sort of post-traumatic superheroes, but I just think that is not Hal Jordan. This is a guy that does not need therapy. He’s so far beyond therapy. It ain’t going to work. This is a guy who’s super directed. He gets the job done. He’s really good at what he does. -- Grant Morrison

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One of the things I love about the DC Universe is that they do have this history and they do have this depth and span and scope in the outline of human life. It’s kind of like environmental art. You’re going into a place. I love the fact that there are thousands of alien races out there that have maybe been seen in one issue of WORLD’S FINEST in 1970, or some bunch of characters that have only ever been seen in some 1990s comic book, and consolidating all that to say, "Oh, that happened and they’re all still here, and they all still have their own agendas, and they’re all out working and doing things in the universe," and we get to suddenly see them. -- Grant Morrison

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


My observation of the current nostalgia for the ‘80s in culture, politics and international relations played a big part in Xmasville —- having lived through the ’80s, I can assure my readers it wasn’t worth being nostalgic about in any way... -- Grant Morrison

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We want to do one [Christmas special] every year until I die. We wanted to show with the Christmas special that this character can operate in any period... he can come up in World War I, he can come up in the AIDS crisis, he can come up in the Summer of Love... it was to make a point that this character can be used in all sorts of ways by bringing him into the present. -- Grant Morrison

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[personal profile] history79



AMAZING HEROES: Is he still going to be the bastard black sheep of the Marvel Family? The angel helper? Still torpedoed by Nazis, and so on?

GRANT MORRISON: No. We've disposed of the incestuous Marvel Family thing. He still gets torpedoed, though. In more ways than one ... The first one's already being drawn by Duncan Fegredo. It was fun to do, as it was a different way of writing for me. I'd just read Ulysses, and I thought I'd do this stream of consciousness thing.

Obviously it's not Joyce, but you know ... we have our sad pretentions. The dark secret of Mister Keeper is revealed in #2. What I wanted to do was do a horror comic. I mean, everybody else in Britain has done one, so I thought it was about time I did one using all the occult I'm involved in. It's all really rather unpleasant. We wanted to do something with no moral values in it at all. He's a wonderful nihilistic character.


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Instead of the big, epic, 12-part stories, we’re focusing down on the everyday life of a space cop. Basically, it’s no more apocalypse-ending storylines. The basic concept is that [Hal Jordan] is like a space cop that patrols a sector of the universe where anything can happen. We’ve made it more like a police procedural. -- Grant Morrison

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[personal profile] alliterator


Newsarama: One final sidenote - what was your reaction to appearing in Suicide Squad, as "The Writer" only to be killed off in issue #58?
Grant Morrison: I think it probably served me right after everything I'd put Buddy Baker through. I just come back from the dead, stronger and stranger, like everyone else in comics.
-- Newsarama interview

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[personal profile] lordultimus


"The Green Lantern basically refers to the Green Lantern, the essential power battery, that doesn't necessarily refer to Hal at all. It actually came from a movie in Britain called The Blue Lamp. It was a police movie, a very early police series, and it gave rise to sort of a famous 1960s police drama which ran for 200 years. It ran until the gang died on the job, basically. The Blue Lamp is the police lamp that hangs outside all the British police stations. So, I just thought, it's The Blue Lamp… The Green Lantern, it's the same thing. It's the science fiction version of that concept. So, it was very much, we wanted to have that The Blue Lamp, The Green Lantern, and so it does, it refers to the concept, rather than to the man.” - Grant Morrison

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The original Doctor Psycho was a hypnotist, a mesmerist, very much akin to the 1940s idea of the creepy hypnotist—the eyes would go blank and you would do as he said. He was very obviously a villain in those stories, this dwarfish, really creepy-looking character that you could not mistake for anything other than a bad guy.

We thought, "What’s the contemporary, modern version of that?"

So, I was looking towards the pickup artist community, and that stuff from Neil Strauss's book, The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists. A good friend of mine actually studied under Neil Strauss to learn all his techniques, so she could detect them when they were used against her. She became the world’s foremost female pickup artist.

So, we really went deep. The Doctor Psycho sequence where he sits and talks to Diana is actually based on the script used by pickup artists. Even the movements he makes, all the gestures—he makes these casting-off gestures every time he talks about something that you won’t have to perceive as negative—it was really tightly worked out to follow. They use scripts.


-- Grant Morrison

40/120 pages )
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Earth-Omega is a place where the good guys are disillusioned and ultraviolent, the bad guys are even more violent, and the authorities are crooked. They must have had the Comics Code at one time because they seem awfully invested in violating it. -- Tom Peyer

The main story, by Tom Peyer and Jamal Igle )

'Hud' Hornet's Holiday in Hell, by Grant Morrison )
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"We were asked to submit a Superman proposal, which we did. It was rejected, and the quote I was given was, 'Do you honestly believe DC will ever give you the keys to the family car?' I can say here and now that the Superman proposal by Waid, Peyer, Morrison, and Millar was the best, most thoroughly worked-out take on a major character you are ever likely to see. It was Superman Plus. I wrote most of it after meeting the Man of Steel at 2am opposite the Sheraton in San Diego -- a true shamanic moment.

"He was wearing the best Superman suit I've seen and looked fantastic as Superman—a cross between Chris Reeve and Billy Zane—so we asked him if he'd answer some questions which he did—in the character of Superman! It was like a possession—I'd say to the guy, 'So how do you feel about Batman?' and he'd come back with 'Well, Batman and I don't really see eye to eye on a lot of things. He's so hung up on the darkness in everyone's soul and I just don't see it that way...' and so on. He spoke to us for about an hour and a half.

"The thing that really hit me, wasn't so much what Superman was saying as how he was sitting. He was perched on a bollard with one knee drawn up, chin resting on his arms. He looked totally relaxed...and I suddenly realized this was how Superman would sit. He wouldn't puff out his chest or posture heroically, he would be totally chilled. If nothing can hurt you, you can afford to be cool. A man like Superman would never have to tense against the cold; never have to flinch in the face of a blow. He would be completely laid back, un-tense. With this image of Superman relaxing on a cloud looking out for us all in my head, I rushed back to my hotel room and filled dozens of pages of my notebook with notes and drawings.

"We had the 21st-century Superman, we had four guys who'd been waiting all their lives to do this, we wanted to launch in January 2000, and we'd have sold a million copies. It would have been the coolest, biggest thing to happen to Kal-El since the Byrne revamp, and DC blew it. I have nothing but respect for Joe Kelly and Jeph Loeb and the other guys currently on the books, but they haven't been allowed to go far enough, and as a result, the current revamp seems a little muted. Not being able to do Superman and not being offered anything else at DC was the main reason I decided to do Marvel Boy for Jimmy Palmiotti and Joe Quesada."
- Grant Morrison







In 1998, four DC Comics writers (Grant Morrison, Mark Waid, Mark Millar, and Tom Peyer) were approached by then new editor for the Superman books Eddie Berganza to bring Superman into the new millennium. By October, they gave him an in-depth 21 page proposal, intending on building on what the Post-Crisis established to reintroduce classic concepts in a new and different light. The plan was to establish the entire Post-Crisis period, with it's relatively limited in scope Superman who thought himself as nothing more than another Earthman, as the prelude to something truly legendary in every meaning of the word.

Berganza gave it the green light, liking it so much that he fired longstanding Superman writers/artists Dan Jurgens and Jerry Ordway in preparation for the coming of the four collaborative writers, whose tenure was scheduled with Berganza's first issue.

However, DC editor Mike Carlin (or possibly publisher Paul Levitz) then returned from vacation and was shocked to discover that big changes were being implemented to Superman without his knowledge. He vetoed the project, partially because such a huge change was being made effectively behind his back and partially because, at this time, DC also adopted a policy of prohibiting "big name creators" from working on their core Superman and Batman books. Ordway was offered his old job back, but declined due to having already lined up work at Marvel. Jurgens was let go in favor of 'new blood'. Berganza recruited then-second tier talent like Joe Kelly and Jeph Loeb, and industry veteran J.M. Dematteis, to script a soft relaunch of the books with little fanfare, though they attempted their own take on reincorporating older concepts into the current Superman mythos.

While most of this is behind closed quarters and we'll likely never truly know everything, there appear to be two different versions of this proposal created. There's some debate as to whether one (specifically, the one more Morrison-centric) was created as an attempt to sway Carlin after his rejection of the first, but both seem to be intertwined. One is Superman NOW, helmed mostly by Grant Morrison, which has never been released to the public and is largely unknown, and the other is Superman: 2000, probably largley curated by Mark Waid, was leaked in spurts through the internet, eventually cobbled together by enterprising fans who wondered what might have been.

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Seaguy #3

Jul. 9th, 2018 10:38 pm
[personal profile] history79



"As the story progressed and took on a life of its own, it soon became clear that it was really about the 'big brothering' of society, omnipresent surveillance and global disinformation. It’s about the dumbing down of culture, the creation of capitalist 'comfort zones' in the midst of social decay, about a world tranquillized and satisfied and quite unaware of the dark glue that holds it all together.

…and talking tuna fish."

- Grant Morrison


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Seaguy #2

Jul. 8th, 2018 09:46 pm
[personal profile] history79



"The very first time we see him, there’s this hand of Death playing chess with him and Death says, “It’s your move, Seaguy.” It’s kind of like being born. The first thing that happens when you’re born is that you’re going to die. The first book is very much a child’s eye view of everything. He’s quite naive. And his features are soft. And he’s got these weird, little animal companions beside him. But he slowly learns. He grows up a little bit. He goes on a voyage and discovers a world that’s bigger and creepier and stranger than he ever imagined."

- Grant Morrison


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Seaguy #1

Jul. 8th, 2018 12:56 am
[personal profile] history79



"The idea is that ten years before the events in Seaguy, there was a final 'Crisis' type battle against the massed forces of evil. Evil was vanquished and the world was made 'perfect'. There are no wars, no fights, no want, no poverty...and nothing much to do. The super-heroes now sit around aimlessly, or ride on fairground attractions as a substitute for the thrill of flying..."

- Grant Morrison


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