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We will also, in our highly diverse presentation, be paying tribute to all of the genuinely marvellous things that attracted us to the comic medium in the first place, while at the same time, in our story’s content and implications we will hopefully be explaining – in an entertaining fashion – exactly why we cannot bear to remain involved in the comic field for a moment longer. - Alan Moore

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Some people probably think that there should be more action, but when we get finished with this Kabbala storyline around #24, there will be action and the readers will then wish there wasn’t so much. -- Alan Moore

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I also had an experience with a demonic creature that told me that its name was Asmoday. Which is Asmodeus. And when I actually was allowed to see what the creature looked like, or what it was prepared to show me, it was this latticework…if you imagine a spider, and then imagine multiple images of that spider, that are kind of linked together–multiple images at different scales, that are all linked together–it’s as if this thing is moving through a different sort of time. You know Marcel Duchamp’s “Nude Descending a Staircase”? Where you can see all the different stages of the movement at once. So if you imagine that you’ve got this spider, that it was moving around, but it was coming from background to foreground, what you’d get is sort of several spiders, if you like, showing the different stages of its movement.

Now if you imagine all of those arranged into a kind of shimmering lattice that was turning itself inside out as I spoke to it, and I was talking to my partner at the time and sort of saying, This thing’s showing us it’s got an extra dimension I haven’t got, and it’s trying to tell me that it’s good at mathematics. It’s vain. There’s something fourth-dimensional about this. This is all stuff I was actually saying at the time, while I was having the experience, which was pretty extreme.

Anyway. Over the next couple of weeks I started researching Asmodeus and found out that actually, yeah, he’s the demon of mathematics.


-- Alan Moore

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Like something from an unbelievable parallel world where there were once comic publications exclusively for girls, this third jaw-dropping installment of Moore and O’Neill’s astonishing swan-song takes us from a boarding school in Big Brother-dominated England to a civic ball with a Frankenstein monster in Toyland, pausing for some 1960s pop-art espionage and a breath-taking musical interlude along the way. Concluding with a demonstration of an unusual nuclear defense system (for which the reader will require 4-D spectacles, thoughtfully provided) and containing Seven Stars classic “Showdown in Space,” you dare not miss issue three of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. IV: The Tempest. -- Issue's solicitation

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I was still committed to progress, which I think was evidenced by some of the very experimental things we did in Tomorrow Stories with Greyshirt and Cobweb, some of the incredibly experimental things we did in Promethea, which I think pushed the capacities, the capabilities, of a flimsy comic book about as far as I have ever personally pushed them. Some of the things we did on Promethea were so smugly clever that I'm still basking in the radiance three or four years later. -- Alan Moore

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Take your curling ticket from the withered and embittered woman in the booth, regard uneasily the lobby cards for movies recalled vaguely from a clammy dream, then, if you dare, follow the failing flashlight-puddle of the usherette on down into a different kind of dark. -- Alan Moore

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When I actually started writing Promethea from the initial proposal, I think I'd written between four and eight pages and then just had to tear them up, because it didn't have any of the life or vitality I wanted, which I added to the strip partly by talking with Jim Williams and coming up with a wildly different vision of New York, and partly by throwing in seemingly irrelevant, absurdist elements, like the Weeping Gorilla posters, the Five Swell Guys... those things added to the mix seemed to make the thing, give it a freshness, an originality and a life. -- Alan Moore

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So I decided to do two or three things with that initial idea of the "Fighting American." Yes, he's a patriotic character, he's satirical, but it's going to be at least as much the satire of Harvey Kurtzman as it was of Simon and Kirby. Because, actually, Kurtzman's satire was sharper and funnier. So combining those elements, and also bringing it up to date so that it's not turned against the Red paranoia of the '50s, but against contemporary phenomena, like The Jerry Springer Show, reality television, etc. -- Alan Moore

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Remember: There's not really a vehicle around now to carry on the innovations Eisner was reaching for. I mean, even Eisner doesn't do The Spirit anymore! There's really no vehicle around now where you can do those wildly experimental stories within that kind of framework. So that became something I enjoyed exploring, and continue to enjoy, with "Greyshirt." -- Alan Moore

Tomorrow Stories Special #1 )

Also, since I might as well include it here as anywhere, here's the Cobweb episode that was originally intended for TOMORROW STORIES but ultimately got pulled by DC over worry that the lawsuit-happy Church of Scientology would go after them for dissing L. Ron Hubbard. It was eventually published by Top Shelf, unchanged save for a name and palette swap for Cobweb for copyright reasons.

La Toile The Cobweb in 'Brighter Than You Think' )
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A lot of Tomorrow Stories was taking characters who didn't seem to me to have modern equivalents, who weren't really standard superheroes, and who I thought had still got something interesting in them. -- Alan Moore

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The main thing I wanted to do was not pastiche or do a homage to The Spirit but to do a homage to the spirit of The Spirit, if you like. The very best thing about Eisner's Spirit was the incredible experimentation, the constant attempts at new storytelling techniques. -- Alan Moore

It's just a pity that those old "Phantom Lady" stories, other than the fact that she's got such wonderful cleavage, there was nothing else to recommend those stories at all; they weren't at all interesting. So with "Cobweb," what I decided to do was to take this kitsch, camp, '50s glamorous crime-fighter character, like the Blonde Phantom or the Black Cat or the Phantom Lady, any of those, and to use it playfully, so that we could do whatever we wanted, where we could jump around and show, I dunno, a five-year-old Li'l Cobweb if we wanted to. -- Alan Moore

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