alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


"At least my face can't turn out like the Joker's, or a giant red light bulb as in that Richie Rich comic...right?"


Okay, time to bring out the heavy stuff here. This tale of revenge upon revenge is so ridiculously, over-the-top grotesque and brutal it makes EC's "Foul Play" look like The Very Hungry Caterpillar by comparison. Warning for violence/gore.

'There! There! There! Suffer! Suffer! Suffer!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher



"And the shapes of the locusts were like unto horses prepared unto battle; and on their heads were as it were crowns like gold, and their faces were as the faces of men."
--Revelation 9:7, King James Version

'Only Special Project Final X remains' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher
At some point in between adventures, and without explanation, Bob White AKA Nightmare exchanged his cool phosphorescent skeleton costume for a more commonplace spandex hero outfit. Nevertheless he, like his sidekick, was still capable of badassery, as this story shows.






'Wow! The giant that ATE the beanstalk!!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


An example of the clinically realistic way superhero comics depict the onset of mental illness.

We're all familiar with the long-discredited Golden Age trope in which exposure to radioactive elements gives people beneficial super-powers. But even then, there were comic-book characters who weren't so lucky when exposed to radiation, voluntarily or otherwise. In the "voluntarily" category, for example, we have Professor Henry Ross, who just wanted to invent a cure for death.

'But in so doing, he created Frankenstein's monster' )
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[personal profile] lordultimus


Since people seemed to like my post on the American Crusader, I thought I'd post another Thrilling Comics character that I like and has been reinvented several times, The Woman In Red.

The Woman In Red is actually credited as the first female masked crime fighter, beating out Wonder Woman, Mary Marvel, and Phantom Lady, and herself was only beaten as first female superhero by one month by Fantomah. Though she never made a cover appearance, she was a regular feature in Thrilling Comics starting issue #2, with her last appearance in issue #46.

Her real identity was Peggy Allen, a policewoman who was frustrated by the limits of her job and created a secret identity. She was aided by the police commissioner, who considered her his operative, and informed her of strange cases, arranged for her undercover investigations, and occasionally kept the regular cops out of the way, who were unaware that they had a vigilante on their payroll.

Peggy's gender almost never came up, outside of some of her disguises and taunts by villains. The joke made in the last panel of this story is the most I can really think of - well, that and occasionally showing her legs.

Warning for racism.

Thrilling Comics #5 )
lordultimus: (Default)
[personal profile] lordultimus


When a recent request for more golden age characters came, I immediately thought of this guy, who's actually appeared in various comics in the modern age, including a webcomic called Heroes Inc. and even had a bit of a shout-out by Grant Morrison in Multiversity. I'm not sure why this character always stuck with me. Maybe it's because I like the name, maybe I find his costume simple but memorable, maybe it's because I like the idea of a patriotic hero with Superman level powers. Or maybe it's because his origin really, really should have just killed him.

But don't take my word for it. Take a look at his origin yourself.

Warning for female abuse.

Thrilling Comics #19 )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




Recently there've been several requests for more obscure Golden Age superheroes. I hear and obey! Let's start off with the origin story of a super-mage originally hailing from Middle-Kingdom era Egypt.


In which the part of Satan will be anachronistically played by Set )
espanolbot: (Default)
[personal profile] espanolbot
Continuing our look at superheroes and villains of times past in comparison to their modern counterparts, we come to one of the more consistantly popular Bat Family characters from the Silver Age: Barbara Gordon!

Read more... )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher
I discovered this Golden Age action hero (created by Bob Powell for Hit Comics in 1940) via the Tumblr blog F**k Yeah Warrior Women and immediately fell in love with her. Attorney (later District Attorney) Betty Bates enjoyed a ten-year run (unusual for a non-superpowered, supporting character), and it's no wonder: in addition to her legal know-how, she was a skilled detective, knew jiu-jitsu, and was handy with her fists too. In the following story (public domain, scans courtesy of ComicBookPlus.com), we see her stand up to sexual harassment, speak truth to power, and foil a kidnapping. As if that weren't awesome enough, the story conveniently comes with a "context is for the weak" panel!





'Bates is the name--MISS Betty Bates!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher


They can't say they weren't warned.



[personal profile] q99 requested some Fantomah, who's among the best-known creations of cult favourite Fletcher Hanks (writing and drawing as Barclay Flagg). So here we go!

'Fantomah wills it!' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




In 1949, the relatively unknown cartoonist Harvey Kurtzman, coming off a run of his one-page gag strip Hey, Look! for Timely, shopped his work around and received his first EC assignment. No, it wasn't on one of their horror titles; those wouldn't be launched until the following year. Nor were they publishing war or satire comics yet. Rather, Kurtzman's EC debut was as illustrator of Lucky Fights It Through, a giveaway 16-page educational comic about syphilis...with a two-fisted cowboy setting, since western comics were in then.

'That ignorant, ignorant cowboy' )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher




"Most superheroic pseudonyms are intended to be understood metaphorically. Iron Man isn't really a man made of iron. Green Lantern isn't a piece of verdant camping equipment, and, by and large, the Beast is in fact a lovely fellow. When it comes to superheroes whose names can be taken literally, or, better yet, at--ahem--face value, there's no more outstanding example than the Eye."

--Jon Morris, The League of Regrettable Superheroes, 46.

Eye don't know how the writer-artist came up with this )

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