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[personal profile] laughing_tree


Romeo and Juliet are also idiotic teenagers who do something incredibly stupid and kill themselves at the end of the story. I thought it would be interesting to start with two people who are adults and not idiotic teenagers. Instead of killing themselves, they have lots of hot sex. But then the result of that sex is a baby. -- Brian K. Vaughan

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


I think I was frustrated working in film and television and sort of bumping up against the “here’s what I can’t do” in television, because maybe it’s too expensive to do this kind of spectacle or “here’s what I can’t do in film” where it’s tough to do R-rated, complex ideas for grown-ups. I was just like, I’m going to take all of my frustrations about what I can’t do in these other two forms of media and just pour it into comics and that hopefully readers will appreciate that. -- Brian K. Vaughan

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


I almost always know exactly when a character is going to die. Sometimes it’s for a very important narrative reason, and sometimes it’s just because life is short and unfair, especially during wartime. I don’t think I’ve ever unexpectedly killed someone off, but there was once or twice that someone earned an unplanned reprieve, usually because Fiona’s art made me see that character in a completely new way. -- Brian K. Vaughan

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


People are always like 'George R.R. Martin or Joss Whedon – these guys are monsters.' But it used to be when people would read fiction, characters would die all the time. I think we’ve grown up in a sort of culture where a lot of our storytelling is controlled by a big corporation – that means we can’t let these characters die, we have to keep them alive. And that’s just a terrible way for fiction to approach things. We read this stuff to prepare us for the worst things that are going to happen to us, and death is the worst. -- Brian K. Vaughan

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[personal profile] mastermahan


Last time, Parker Robbins tried to bust his cousin John out of police detention (magically electrocuting some FBI agents in the process), but John refused to go, and instead asked Parker to pawn their stolen diamond to hire a good lawyer.Read more... )
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[personal profile] mastermahan


Last issue, The Hood escaped with 1.5 million of stolen blood diamonds, but not until he accidentally shot a cop and his cousin John was arrested.Read more... )
mastermahan: (Default)
[personal profile] mastermahan


Since Foolkiller ended with the implication Frank Castle was about to shoot The Hood, and the general consensus was "good riddance", I thought I'd take us all back to a time before Parker Robbins was a lame magic Kingpin wannabe, with the MAX series that first introduced him, written by a pre-Runaways and Y: The Last Man Brian K. Vaughn and drawn by Kyle Hotz.

Trigger warning for racism and sexist language.Read more... )
[personal profile] history79



"We wondered if he thought a planet full of women could ultimately rebuild society and sustain itself once again. Vaughan was surprisingly optimistic on that front. "Yes, I do think it could. There were a lot of people early on in the first year who complained, "Wow, this is such a misogynistic book to say that, because the men died, the women can't get the electricity running all over the world and the airports up and running again." I think that's an extremely complex, extremely difficult thing to deal with. When three billion people die, I don't care what their sex was, that's an incredibly difficult thing to come back from. I will say that the world would be better off than if it were just the men left. I think that would be an even more dire situation. I think there is hope for the planet."

Source: http://www.ign.com/articles/2008/02/02/y-the-last-man-the-end-of-an-era?page=5


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[personal profile] stubbleupdate
Following on from Wonder Woman v.2 #160 comes Wonder Woman v.2 #161. And then, after a fashion, comes Wonder Woman '77 #14, where Manhunter writer Marc Andreyko did a Clayface story set on Paradise Island.

When we left the scans in the previous post, Clayface had announced that he was going to take Diana's Clay and get Wonder Woman powers, in a fit of logic only matched by Absorbing Man trying to break into a museum to steal some moon rock. It worked, thanks to Comic Book Logic, and Clayface became super strong and could fly, but Diana wasn't destroyed, only left weaker and younger.

She retreated to nearby Titans Tower where she ran into Donna Troy, now her doppelganger. And so we continue...

Clay time is over )
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[personal profile] stubbleupdate
*In 2017, that would be a relatively big deal. But in 2000, when Wonder Woman Vol.2 #160 was released, it was just a two part story in among a series of short one and two part stories by artists and writers whose name I don't really recognise, though art in this story is handled by Scott Kolins.
This two parter is collected in the Batman: False Faces trade that has BKV's early work at DC writing Batman, Batvillains, and Wonder Woman. It's nothing amazing, but it does give a nice Wonder Woman story with an angle that seems obvious in hindsight.

I haven't read a lot of Wonder Woman, apart from some stuff around Infinite Crisis (over a decade ago. Gosh.), the Power Girl guest appearance, and bits of Sensation Comics until I ended up behind.

The story starts with Cheetah holding a car above her head and threatening that "If Wonder Woman doesn't show up in the next five minutes...I will kill every last one of you".
Two cops are watching and ready to run out from behind cover to engage Cheetah when Wonder Woman descends from the sky and says "I was hoping I could end this peacefully"
Wonder Woman vs. Cheetah? )
cyberghostface: (Jack)
[personal profile] cyberghostface
 

Here we are with the next installment of superhero turned mayor Mitchell Hundred.

As a heads up, this arc gets really gory at times.

Scans under the cut... )
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[personal profile] cyberghostface
 

In light of discussions concerning superhero comics mixing with politics, here's a comic that's about a former superhero who becomes mayor of New York. It debuted in 2004 and ran for fifty regular issues plus four 'specials'. These comics were published around the same time as Vaughan's 'Runaways' (more or less) which should give you an idea of his versatility as a writer.

Warning for racism and suicide

Scans under the cut... )

Barrier #2

Dec. 12th, 2016 12:55 am
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


"We wanted to find an entertaining, unconventional and, most importantly, visual way to explore a complicated issue. [...] We didn’t exactly need a crystal ball to guess that it might be immigration. -- Brian K. Vaughan

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