laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


They’re both small furry mammals and they’re both plagued by inner pain. But where Rocket is a raccoon—a thief—Castor is a beaver—a worker. In some ways, he’s been poisoned by that; work doesn’t make him happy, his damming projects are creating an environmental disaster, but he can’t stop. He’s driven by the ghost of his father—to achieve more and more, without knowing why. In some ways, despite the fact that Rocket’s essentially a failure and a guy who lost everything that mattered to him a long time ago, he’s retained more of his soul than someone like Gnawbarque. -- Al Ewing

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


Pulp-absurdist space heist heartbreak as you like it! Just don't call him Rocket Raccoon! because as we all know his real name is Rocketagar Racoonagon etc -- Al Ewing

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


What is it like, inside The Colon? In the hot, cramped confines of The Colon? How did Rocket end up in The Colon? Some would say that, in a real sense, Rocket entered The Colon the moment I began work on the character. Anyway, to answer your question: The Colon is a dark place, where the squeeze is on and something somewhere stinks. There’s a network of tough guys there—a ring of muscle, if you will—and Rocket has to navigate the twists and turns of The Colon in order to escape through the rear exit. It’s very much a bum note in his life. Anyway, it’s named after the punctuation mark, clearly. -- Al Ewing

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


I’m of the opinion that there’s no such thing as a “D-list” character. Every character in a shared universe has something about them that’s cool, or interesting, or worthy of re-examination, which is why my team books so far have tended to feature the less-hyped heroes. So it’s not so much that I want to turn them into something different – the idea is to find something about them that makes me want to tell stories about them, and bring it out. And every character has that something – there’s really no such thing as a bad character in a superhero universe. -- Al Ewing

Read more... )
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


It’s definitely on my mind as I write him – the idea that he had an entirely different life, long ago, that he doesn’t like to talk about. The Mantlo/Mignola/Gordon “Rocket Raccoon” limited series got reprinted in one of the Marvel UK comics of my childhood, so I do have some rosy, cosy memories of it. He was pretty much a totally different person back then – and from what I recall, a much less troubled one. Occasionally, bits and pieces of that old life will surface – someone will get past his defenses by reminding him of the old days, or he’ll have retained a piece of kit from his time as Ranger Rocket – but to remember is painful. It’s a very noir trope – the old, good time that the hero lost and can never get back. The long-buried sadness. -- Al Ewing

Read more... )
[personal profile] astrakhan42
Do you want some more MCU-style Guardians of the Galaxy tales starring Rocket Raccoon doing heists written by Al Ewing and featuring a classic Marvel UK villain team? Of course you do.

And speaking of the UK, let's start with a Hitchhiker's Guide reference )
lordultimus: (Default)
[personal profile] lordultimus
Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy is getting a shake-up this fall with "All-New All-Different Marvel," with members leaving, members joining, and a new leader whom Brian Michael Bendis describes as having "a Napoleon Complex." In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, the long-time Marvel writer talks about the title's upcoming relaunch with Valerio Schiti for "All-New All-Different Marvel" and how the team is the "underdogs of the underdogs."

Read more... )
informationgeek: (Default)
[personal profile] informationgeek
thetrialofjeangreypart100

Marvel.com: The Guardians usually find themselves on the other side of the law, yet their teaser word is "Judgment." Are they passing judgment on the X-Men or helping the teens escape judgment?

Brian Michael Bendis: Right there, that is the reason to tell the story. Everyone has a judgment, but whose is right? Should Jean be held accountable for things that she has not done yet? Should she be stopped before it happens again? Is a crime a crime if the person who committed the crime hasn't committed it yet?

Writer: Brian Michael Bendis
Artist: Sara Pichelli
Colorist: Justin Ponsor

This will be a quick look at short crossover event between Guardians of the Galaxy and All-New X-Men, The Trial of Jean Grey.

Read More... )
informationgeek: (Default)
[personal profile] informationgeek
Well here's a solicit that caught my attention today when I looked at Marvel's solicit list. We got an all new line up for Guardians of the Galaxy, including a new team leader and person behind a mask.

Read More... )

Profile

scans_daily: (Default)
Scans Daily

Extras

Founded by girl geeks and members of the slash fandom, [community profile] scans_daily strives to provide an atmosphere which is LGBTQ-friendly, anti-racist, anti-ableist, woman-friendly and otherwise discrimination and harassment free.

Bottom line: If slash, feminism or anti-oppressive practice makes you react negatively, [community profile] scans_daily is probably not for you.

Please read the community ethos and rules before posting or commenting.

October 2017

S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 2425262728
293031    

Most Popular Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags