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[personal profile] laughing_tree


Elisha the Alpha Primitive could be described as your typical liberal post-grad student—the kind that waits on line in the rain for the newest iPhone. He is mostly a product of his experience—the oppression suffered by the Alpha Primitives, a servant caste of the Inhumans. An Inhuman taught Elisha to read and got imprisoned for it. Now enlightened, and with postgrad degrees from M.I.T., Elisha remains a second or even third-class citizen due to his genetic disposition—which casts a pall upon the more “enlightened” Inhuman society. His character theme is, therefore, about discrimination—especially among liberal free thinkers such as the Inhumans. -- Christopher J. Priest

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“OAFK” is a lot like “X-Men: First Class” with The Inhumans. They are the characters the audience knows and loves but are fresh out of the gate and, therefore, different enough that following their development is fun and exciting. -- Christopher J. Priest

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I see this series as part of a bigger and more complex overall history. As I see it, we can either bore people to death by trying to be too much, or we can go the “Rogue One” route and tell a fun story which embellishes key points of their origin. I presume if the audience wants to see more of this era of the Inhumans, Marvel will respond. -- Christopher J. Priest

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“Once And Future Kings” is kind of a circular firing squad; a “Game of Thrones”-ish mashup of shifting alliances and changing motives. If we get this wrong, this will be a confusing mess. If we get it right, “Inhumans: Once And Future Kings” will, hopefully, be a story debated over long after I’ve been drubbed out the business. -- Christopher J. Priest

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[personal profile] thanekos
It's written by Christopher Priest and drawn by Phil Noto.

It's also fantastic.

It tells its story of understandable motives and relations with an uncanny cast.

Issue #2 picks up where #1 left off.

The protagonists're still where Lockjaw took them. )
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[personal profile] laughing_tree


In the original comics, I found it ironic that The Good King Whose Name Is Unspoken was condemned, primarily, for wanting to destroy a terrible weapon designed to wipe out all of mankind. Yes, there were allusions to the Good King becoming The Mad King, but Black Bolt ultimately challenged his monarch because The King had stolen, with intent to destroy, The Slave Engine. Now, I’m unclear of how that choice makes Black Bolt a “pure” hero any more than his attempts to destroy an obvious weapon of terrible evil made the King a “Mad” King. -- Christopher J. Priest

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[personal profile] superboyprime


"This speaks to me of a guy who, like I perceive Doom, doesn't believe that he should own the world because he feels like he is worthy and nobody else recognizes it. To me, Doctor Doom's big secret, although he would never even admit it to himself, is that he wants to own the world because secretly he believes that if he does, it will validate all the things he wants to believe about himself. It's a complete 180 of the way we tend to think about Doom." – Mark Waid

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'When “Civil War II” was on the table, and we started discussing it at the retreats, I had a very early talk with Tom Brevoort about how I was desperate to write the epilogue. I was a huge fan of what Brian Bendis had done with “The Confession.” [The epilogue one-shot to the first “Civil War.”] It was one of my favorite event comics ever. I really wanted to have my name on something that at least aspired to do the same type of thing.' -- Nick Spencer

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[personal profile] stubbleupdate
Because of a frankly stupid Comixology sale* I picked up the Edmondson/Noto run on Black Widow. I'd previous read Edmondson in Who is Jake Ellis, Where is Jake Ellis, a bit of The Activity and his 1872 run, before dropping Red Wolf like a hot potato. And yes, it is true that Edmondson is problematic at best. Noto on art has gone from being a nice pin up artist but a bad story teller to a dynamic and cinematic storyteller.

The plot of the Edmondson/Noto Black Widow run is that an organisation, Chaos, and Natasha aren't getting on. She goes after their assets. They go after her accountant. She goes after their accountants. She gets names and details and calls a meeting, hiring a cruise liner for the occasion.
The meeting )


In the sale, I picked up

Two volumes of Aaron's Doctor Strange
Two volumes of Edmondson's Black Widow
The first Thor Visionaries


I would recommend
All of Fraction's Hawkeye for a tenner. Honestly, you're a fool if you don't.
All of Waid's Fantastic Four
All of Hickman's Fantastic Four
SECRET WARS
Hyperion: Daddy Issues
Doctor Strange: The Oath
Astonishing X-Men
War of Kings
House of M
Chelsea Cain's Mockingbird
Ellis's Moon Knight
Fraction's Defenders
Patsy Walker: Hellcat (by Kathryn Immonen)
Runaways

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