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[personal profile] laughing_tree


I'm probably out of step with most Marvel writers, in that I've stopped thinking of this as toys in a toybox. I'd rather think of what we do as a never-ending improv. I'm handing over the scene - all I can do is leave it in an interesting place and wait for the "yes, and..." to come [...] I ended on a cliffhanger. Well - not a cliffhanger per se, but definitely something that'll make the reader wonder where things will go from there. Oh, we end our plot threads - particularly regarding the Progenitors and a couple of other ongoing issues - but we don't pretend the ongoing story of the Inhumans is going to end there. The Inhumans will be back - it's just a question of when. -- Al Ewing

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


Is Terrigen sentient? “Sentient” is a big, woolly word. I don’t know if Terrigen can be quantified as having sentience, but I would say it has poetry. Maybe that’s a consequence of it being one of the big, primal elements of a narrative fictional universe. Everything in the Marvel Universe has poetry in at least some small way, everything was created and set in motion by storytellers. -- Al Ewing

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


Elisha the Alpha Primitive could be described as your typical liberal post-grad student—the kind that waits on line in the rain for the newest iPhone. He is mostly a product of his experience—the oppression suffered by the Alpha Primitives, a servant caste of the Inhumans. An Inhuman taught Elisha to read and got imprisoned for it. Now enlightened, and with postgrad degrees from M.I.T., Elisha remains a second or even third-class citizen due to his genetic disposition—which casts a pall upon the more “enlightened” Inhuman society. His character theme is, therefore, about discrimination—especially among liberal free thinkers such as the Inhumans. -- Christopher J. Priest

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There have been some comparisons made by fans to the Celestials — those aren’t without merit, considering there’s a touch of the Von Daniken about the Progenitors — but the Celestials are, now, fairly knowable and fairly known. So I wanted to create something new, something that was more a kind of mid-point between the Celestials and, say, the Kree, a species that was a Type Three, Type Four civilization, but not so advanced as to be hanging out in the cosmic realms. And something that could go anywhere if other writers wanted to use them. [...] I didn’t want them to talk like people talk. The “essentially speaking English” thing works for most of the alien races, because they all serve, in one way or another, as metaphors for what we know. The Progenitors are metaphors for what we don’t or can’t know. (Fun fact — they were originally going to talk entirely in alchemical symbols. That idea proved unworkable very fast, though I’m sure Clayton Cowles, our letterer, would have been over the moon with me about it.) -- Al Ewing

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


“OAFK” is a lot like “X-Men: First Class” with The Inhumans. They are the characters the audience knows and loves but are fresh out of the gate and, therefore, different enough that following their development is fun and exciting. -- Christopher J. Priest

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


They’re an ancient civilization that runs of science that existed before we even knew what science was. They don’t obey our physical laws — Reader’s power just defies explanation, although if you’re a quantum physicist please tell me if that helps — but they’re not magic, either. They live in a strange zone of poetic, magical thinking, where a human being can become a door that takes you where you need to be, or commune with his ancestors by summoning them into his flesh. -- Al Ewing

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


This is me jamming my science fiction hat on so far there’s just a little pair of feet poking out of it. The reason to be excited about the Progenitors isn’t because of their continuity connections, or the earth-shattering revelations they embody that will change the entirety of Marvel Space forever – I’ve pushed that button before, and it doesn’t bring the boys to the yard. The reason to be excited by these dudes is because they are incredibly awesome. They’re a brand-new alien threat to the Marvel Universe, beautifully designed by Javier Rodriguez, and they are a Type IV Civilization on the Kardashev scale. -- Al Ewing

Medusa is my favorite Marvel character, so as you can imagine, this is not a challenge, it is pure pleasure. -- Javier Rodriguez

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


I see this series as part of a bigger and more complex overall history. As I see it, we can either bore people to death by trying to be too much, or we can go the “Rogue One” route and tell a fun story which embellishes key points of their origin. I presume if the audience wants to see more of this era of the Inhumans, Marvel will respond. -- Christopher J. Priest

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


“Once And Future Kings” is kind of a circular firing squad; a “Game of Thrones”-ish mashup of shifting alliances and changing motives. If we get this wrong, this will be a confusing mess. If we get it right, “Inhumans: Once And Future Kings” will, hopefully, be a story debated over long after I’ve been drubbed out the business. -- Christopher J. Priest

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


Ultimates2 and Royals are two sides of the same coin – two kinds of “deep cosmic” book – with one dealing very heavily with the kind of giant cosmic archetypes of Marvel, and one based much more in physical space and sci-fi adventure, but still speaking in metaphors and trying to mine out some gigantic new concepts from “out there” and bring them back “in here”. -- Al Ewing

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[personal profile] thanekos
It's written by Christopher Priest and drawn by Phil Noto.

It's also fantastic.

It tells its story of understandable motives and relations with an uncanny cast.

Issue #2 picks up where #1 left off.

The protagonists're still where Lockjaw took them. )
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[personal profile] laughing_tree


One of the things I wanted to originally go for with this series was to create a kind of “myth from the future”—a science-fiction quest based on the classical Argonauts/Prometheus model. One of the cornerstones of that was the idea that some meaningful number would venture forth and one less would come back. Someone pays the price for stealing fire from Heaven, and there’s no shortage of likely candidates… -- Al Ewing

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


In the original comics, I found it ironic that The Good King Whose Name Is Unspoken was condemned, primarily, for wanting to destroy a terrible weapon designed to wipe out all of mankind. Yes, there were allusions to the Good King becoming The Mad King, but Black Bolt ultimately challenged his monarch because The King had stolen, with intent to destroy, The Slave Engine. Now, I’m unclear of how that choice makes Black Bolt a “pure” hero any more than his attempts to destroy an obvious weapon of terrible evil made the King a “Mad” King. -- Christopher J. Priest

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[personal profile] laughing_tree


There’s a thing readers should understand with this book: we’re not doing business in the normal way. There will be no tie-ins until we get back to Earth. We’re self-contained, telling our own story, beholden to nobody, and we’re on a trip out to the far reaches of Marvel Space, and we’re going to come back changed, and carrying something very special with us. -- Al Ewing

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laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree


If I told you ‘Anyone could die, honest!’... well, you wouldn't believe me. It'd be just more high stakes, like in every issue of every cape comic ever. But if I tell you that someone will die, that it's prophesied, baked in, suddenly there really are high stakes. One of these people is going to go to the far shore and not come back. And you're going to fall in love with all of these characters, so it's going to matter when it happens. -- Al Ewing

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